sheryl crow

Music Monday: Bob Dylan 1989

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Bob Dylan Image One
Photo Credit: alldylan.com

Now that I have access to some old Billboard magazines, thirty years ago, today, Everything Is Broken, by American singer/songwriter, author and visual artist Bob Dylan, debuted on the Billboard Mainstream Rock chart (called Album Rock Tracks back in 1989), entering at #23. Released from the album Oh Mercy, his 26th studio album, the song is a reflection of Dylan’s detachment from his world. It peaked at number eight after eight weeks on the chart.

From Wikipedia:

The track found on Oh Mercy is an April 1989 re-working of a take recorded the previous month. Originally recorded as “Broken Days” in March 1989, Dylan had re-written the song entirely by April, giving it its current name.

In an interview with Nigel Williamson (the author of The Rough Guide to Bob Dylan) and Oh Mercy’s producer, Daniel Lanois, he described how Dylan would rework his songs over and over again:

“I sat next to him for two months while he wrote [Oh Mercy] and it was extraordinary. Bob overwrites. He keeps chipping away at his verses. He has a place for all his favorite couplets and those couplets can be interchangeable. I’ve seen the same lyrics show up in two or three different songs as he cuts and pastes them around, so, it’s not quite as sacred ground as you might think.”

Bob Dylan Image Two
Image Credit: wikipedia.org & wikimedia.org

From All Dylan:

“Most of them [the songs on “Oh Mercy”] are stream-of-consciousness songs, the kind that come to you in the middle of the night, when you just want to go back to bed. The harder you try to do something, the more it evades you. These weren’t like that.”
~Bob Dylan (to Edna Gundersen, September 21, 1989)

“While it would be unfair to compare ‘Oh Mercy’ to Dylan’s Sixties recordings, it sits well alongside his impressive body of work.”
~Clinton Heylin (Behind The Shades)

[While] promoting The Traveling Wilburys in the fall of 1988, George Harrison discussed some of Dylan’s upcoming work. Harrison [was] enthused about Dylan’s new songs…informing a skeptical world that the experience of recording the Wilburys had given him the urge to write again.

[Bono], lead singer of U2, paid Dylan a visit at his home. When he asked Dylan if he had written any new songs, Dylan showed him the ones stored in his drawer. Bono urged him to record the songs but, Dylan was reluctant.

Notable Cover Versions:
Kenny Wayne Shepherd
Sheryl Crow


 
Lyrics [via LyricFind]
Broken lines, broken strings
Broken threads, broken springs
Broken idols, broken heads
People sleeping in broken beds
Ain’t no use jiving
Ain’t no use joking
Everything is broken

Broken bottles, broken plates
Broken switches, broken gates
Broken dishes, broken parts
Streets are filled with broken hearts
Broken words never meant to be spoken
Everything is broken

Bridge: Seem like every time you stop and turn around
Something else just hit the ground

Broken cutters, broken saws
Broken buckles, broken laws
Broken bodies, broken bones
Broken voices on broken phones
Take a deep breath, feel like you’re chokin’
Everything is broken

Every time you leave and go off someplace
Things fall to pieces in my face

Broken hands on broken ploughs
Broken treaties, broken vows
Broken pipes, broken tools
People bending broken rules
Hound dog howling, bull frog croaking
Everything is broken

30-Day Song Challenge: Day 24

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Music Challenge Image
Photo Credit: goodreads.com

A song by a band you still wish were together…

Oh, the music we have lost.

Lone Justice (1982-1986)
What a powerhouse voice this little thing had. I wore out the Shelter cassette.


 


 

Cry of Love (1989-1997)
A band out of Raleigh, they only made one studio album in 1993 with their original lead singer, Kelly Holland, who quit after one tour. He died young in 2014 at the age of 52. They got a lot of airplay, locally. The remaining members tried to continue with former Warrant lead singer, Robert Mason and made a second album that produced one single in 1997. Band members moved on/scattered to The Black Crowes, Lynyrd Skynyrd and Sheryl Crow‘s touring band. To me, once Kelly left, the magical sound was gone (no offense to Robert Mason).


 


 

Seven Mary Three (1992-2012)
A band out of Williamsburg, Virginia, they started when two Jasons met at William & Mary. The band name came from the TV Show CHiPs as 7 Mary 3 was Officer Jon Baker‘s call sign. Their best-selling album, American Standard, was produced in 1995 by the, now, defunct Mammoth Records out of Carrboro, NC, after their first attempt in 1994 failed to chart.


 


 

Far Too Jones (1995-2000)
This was another band out of Raleigh, nicknamed the Tobacco Road Quintet. They also had one album produced by Mammoth Records and got a lot of local airplay. The only reason this band broke up, as best as I can tell, is because they had no label support. They just couldn’t break out of the region, much like what happened to Echo 7 in Myrtle Beach (whom, I know, personally…I may have to put up some of their music one day).


 


 

And, just for Christmas Eve, this one. I remember this playing on G105 in the late 90s. This band was so loved here. Quote from them, regarding this song, posted on Facebook, yesterday:

“A little history on that one… we wrote it for the Acoustic Christmas Party we did for G105 many moons ago. We actually did not know we were going to write a song until one of the on-air personalities mentioned on the air that we were…LOL!”