FFTD: A Dandy Lion

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They are all over my yard. They are so happy. This one is from last year. ~Vic

Dandy Lion Image
03-31-2019

Flower for the Day

29 thoughts on “FFTD: A Dandy Lion

    Stine Writing said:
    March 11, 2020 at 11:38 PM

    Everybody wants the perfect lawn with no dandy lions! I don’t mind them and their color!

    Like

      The Hinoeuma responded:
      March 12, 2020 at 12:20 AM

      Not only are they cute, they are also an herb. I routinely drink dandelion root tea and eat dandelion greens. Excellent for the gallbladder…

      Like

        Stine Writing said:
        March 12, 2020 at 8:37 PM

        really? What does it taste like? It seems like it would be bitter. What do you do about the roots? pick it and clean it? Is the flower part poison?

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          The Hinoeuma responded:
          March 13, 2020 at 12:08 AM

          The leaves are, indeed, bitter but not too bad. The bitterness is what helps the gallbladder. Mix them with other greens like lettuces, arugula, spinach, kale, beet greens… Or, saute them with other veggies. YUM.

          I’ve never harvested dandelion, myself. Though they are all over my yard, my other half spent many years using commercial fertilizer and way too much Roundup for me to eat anything here. I get organic leaves from my local market or Whole Foods or our farmers market. The root…you can get that with Traditional Medicinals teas. The roasted root tea has a wonderful nutty flavor. I prefer it over regular dandelion tea.

          If you grow them wild without chemical contamination, this might help:
          https://www.treehugger.com/lawn-garden/eat-dandelions-9-edible-garden-weeds.html

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            Stine Writing said:
            March 13, 2020 at 11:28 PM

            Thank you for the information. I will look into it. I am usually willing to try something at least once.

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    Kenneth T. said:
    March 11, 2020 at 11:46 PM

    I haven’t seen a decent dandelion field in a loooong time.

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      The Hinoeuma responded:
      March 12, 2020 at 12:22 AM

      People think they are weeds that need to be eradicated. They are herbs, good for the gallbladder.

      Liked by 1 person

        Kenneth T. said:
        March 12, 2020 at 2:22 AM

        My momma served the greens to my sister and I when we were younger. I didn’t like them then, but I would try them now though.
        … who knows

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          The Hinoeuma responded:
          March 12, 2020 at 2:46 AM

          They are very bitter, very strong. That is what makes them good for the gallbladder. That being said, roasted dandelion root tea has a nutty flavor. It’s quite delicious with honey or cinnamon oil stevia.

          Liked by 1 person

            Kenneth T. said:
            March 12, 2020 at 11:31 AM

            I’ve also heard that dandelion wine is good – if you’re into that sort of thing.

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    David Redpath said:
    March 12, 2020 at 12:34 AM

    With a proud mane 🦁

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    bereavedandbeingasingleparent said:
    March 12, 2020 at 4:12 AM

    Our lawn is ore dandelion than grass these days.

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      The Hinoeuma responded:
      March 12, 2020 at 12:39 PM

      Hey. Wild herbs. Do you get Traditional Medicinal teas in the UK? Excellent brand. Roasted dandelion root tea has a nutty flavor…great with honey or liquid stevia. Dandelion greens are good in salad. Good for the gallbladder.

      Like

    ruthsoaper said:
    March 12, 2020 at 8:57 AM

    I think we (society) shot itself in the foot when we began poisoning dandelions (and other weeds). Dandelions should likely be considered a superfood plus they are easy to grow. They are also one of the first foods available in the spring for the bees to forage.

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      The Hinoeuma responded:
      March 12, 2020 at 12:46 PM

      Exactly! They aren’t weeds. They are wild herbs. I drink dandelion root tea nearly every day and eat dandelion greens in salad. They are the bitters that help gallbladders. I can’t eat the ones in my yard as my SO poisoned the yard for years with industrial fertilizer & large quantities of Roundup. 🙄😠

      Liked by 1 person

    badfinger20 said:
    March 12, 2020 at 10:05 AM

    I always liked them…didn’t like cutting them down.

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      The Hinoeuma responded:
      March 14, 2020 at 2:13 PM

      Another comment that didn’t show up in my panel. Geez.

      You reminded me of Alan Watts. He stated in a lecture that, as a kid, he preferred the wildflowers to them being mowed down.

      When I (finally) saw your comment, Alan Watts was the first thing that popped into my head. Then, I thought…”How apropos. Max has the heart of a philosopher, anyway.”

      Dude. You rock. Channeling Watts…and I am not at all surprised.

      Like

    Dayphoto said:
    March 12, 2020 at 10:56 AM

    They are one of my most favorite flowers! YAY we won’t see any until April.

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    The Hinoeuma responded:
    March 12, 2020 at 1:10 PM

    Thank you! I play when I can! 😁

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    bayphotosbydonna said:
    March 12, 2020 at 10:49 PM

    Sunshiny bright! They really are pretty little flowers when we take the time to look at them.

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      The Hinoeuma responded:
      March 13, 2020 at 12:10 AM

      And, edible, too.

      Liked by 1 person

        bayphotosbydonna said:
        March 13, 2020 at 7:17 AM

        I remember my dad making dandelion wine when I was a kid and I’ve tried the greens in a salad. 🙂

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          The Hinoeuma responded:
          March 13, 2020 at 1:54 PM

          I would love to taste some dandelion wine.

          The greens are bitter. That is why they are so good for your gallbladder. I’m having trouble finding them right now. I also drink a lot of roasted dandelion root tea. Traditional Medicinals carries that and regular dandelion tea. The root tea has a nutty flavor.

          Liked by 1 person

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