Throwback Thursday: Gettysburg Address 1863

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Lincoln's Gettysburg Address NatGeo Image One
Image Credit: National Geographic

One hundred, fifty-seven years ago, today, President Abraham Lincoln gave his famous speech at the dedication of the Soldier’s National Cemetery in Gettysburg. The Battle of Gettysburg had just been 4 1/2 months prior. Lincoln was in the early stages of a mild case of small pox.

Elihu Vedder Mural Wiki Image Two
Mural by artist Elihu Vedder 1896
Library of Congress
Photographer: Carol Highsmith 2007
Image Credit: Wikipedia & Wikimedia

Text of the Speech:

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Additional Reading:
Speeches & Writings (Abraham Lincoln Online)
Britannica
History Channel
National Geographic
National Park Service

20 thoughts on “Throwback Thursday: Gettysburg Address 1863

    JT Twissel said:
    November 19, 2020 at 4:53 PM

    I wish certain politicians got the “for the people” part of Lincoln’s address. A good reminder of a true patriot.

    Liked by 1 person

    bereavedandbeingasingleparent said:
    November 19, 2020 at 6:42 PM

    For the people. I guess these days that means for ourselves. Politicians thinking anything else are a rarity.

    Liked by 1 person

    Tippy Gnu said:
    November 19, 2020 at 7:13 PM

    Very eloquent words during such a trying time in our country.

    Liked by 1 person

      The Hinoeuma responded:
      November 19, 2020 at 9:11 PM

      I agree. I never paid attention to when the speech was. It was a pleasant surprise to discover it, again, for today. And, it brought back a memory from middle school for me. I remember being in class and a small group of us were tasked with reciting it. It was too long for one of us to remember it all by memory, so our teacher broke it up into smaller bits and we took turns reciting our pieces. My section was:
      “But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.”

      I still hear my own young voice with the “dedicate, consecrate, hallow this ground…” part. I didn’t even know what “consecrate” meant. We were taught to recite it but, I don’t recall any teacher telling us the significance of the speech.

      More should read it.

      Liked by 1 person

        Tippy Gnu said:
        November 19, 2020 at 9:19 PM

        Most agree it was one of the greatest speeches in our history. And short, too. I like short speeches.

        Like

          The Hinoeuma responded:
          November 19, 2020 at 10:25 PM

          Me, too. LOL! Edward Everett droned on for two hours.

          Liked by 1 person

          joyroses13 said:
          November 20, 2020 at 9:20 AM

          It didn’t seem so short though when memorizing it for school! But it is a great speech!

          Liked by 1 person

            The Hinoeuma responded:
            November 20, 2020 at 1:46 PM

            I remember dreading my few lines. Thank goodness no one had to remember or recite Everette. 😊

            Like

            Tippy Gnu said:
            November 20, 2020 at 8:56 PM

            I never had to memorize it. You must have had a mean teacher.

            Like

              joyroses13 said:
              November 20, 2020 at 8:51 PM

              Probably more due to the fact that I lived in Pennsylvania, very close to Gettysburg. 🙂

              Liked by 2 people

                Tippy Gnu said:
                November 20, 2020 at 9:40 PM

                Oh yeah, I can see how that would be a problem. I’ll bet you cursed that damned Robert E. Lee for invading your state.

                Liked by 2 people

    MichaelStephenWills said:
    November 20, 2020 at 8:52 AM

    amen

    Liked by 1 person

    joyroses13 said:
    November 20, 2020 at 9:24 AM

    As others have said this is an awesome speech. A powerful and eloquent one.
    We have been to Gettysburg so many times. A great historical town! And this speech was a very important time in history. Good post!

    Like

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