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Shutterbug Saturday: Halloween Local 4.0

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The mood of our country isn’t really conducive to decorating or celebrating. There are a few highlights, here but, our town isn’t showing a lot of Halloween spirit. It’s a complete shame but, I managed to get a few shots. ~Vic

Halloween Local 3.0

Pumpkins In A Row Image One
Pumpkin Row
09-26-2020
Click for a larger view.
Pipe Skeleton Image Two
The skeleton guy has shoes, now.
10-14-2020
Click for a larger view.
Skeletons Image Three
I love the bird skeleton.
09-26-2020
Click for a larger view.
Great Pumpkin Image Four
It’s the Great Pumpkin!
This was on a box, on the ground, at our local market.
10-07-2020
Click for a larger view.
Gargoyle Image Five
Gargoyle in a local bar.
10-01-2020
Click for a larger view.
Insurance Decoration Image Six
Local insurance company.
10-07-2020
Click for a larger view.
Local Insurance Company Image Seven
They did a nice job.
10-07-2020
Click for a larger view.
Pumpkin Decoration Image Eight
A neighbor a block away.
10-01-2020
Click for a larger view.
Pumpkin Decoration Image Nine
Lovely decorations.
10-01-2020
Click for a larger view.
Pumpkin Deocrations Image Ten
Lumpy pumpkin.
10-01-2020
Click for a larger view.
Ghost & Skeleton Decoration Image Eleven
Spooky ghostie & bat skeleton.
10-10-2020
Click for a larger view.
Glowing Ghost Image Twelve
Glowing Ghostie
10-08-2020
Click for a larger view.
My Front Yard Image Thirteen
My front yard.
The pumpkin will be carved for Halloween.
10-20-2020
Click for a larger view.

Flashback Friday: Kodak 1888

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Kodak Image One
Photo Credit: The Mirror UK

One-hundred, thirty-two years ago, today, inventor George Eastman received a patent (number 388,850) for [the shutter of a roll-film hand camera] and the trademark (number 15,825) for the Kodak name […].

Birth of a Company

In 1879, London was the center of the photographic and business world. George Eastman went there to obtain a patent on his plate-coating machine. An American patent was granted the following year. In April 1880, Eastman leased the third floor of a building on State Street in Rochester and began to manufacture dry plates for sale. Success of the dry plate venture so impressed businessman Henry A. Strong, that he invested some money in the infant concern. On January 1, 1881, Eastman and Strong formed a partnership called The Eastman Dry Plate Company. While actively managing all phases of the firm’s activities, [Eastman] continued research in an effort to simplify photography.

In 1883, Eastman startled the trade with the announcement of film in rolls, with the roll holder adaptable to nearly every plate camera on the market. [By] 1884, the Eastman-Strong partnership had given way to a new firm…the Eastman Dry Plate and Film Company with 14 shareowners.

George Eastman History
Kodak

Building the Foundation
Web Archive

Kodak Instamatic Image Two
Photo Credit: Ebay

The immediate triumph of the camera prompted Eastman to change the name of his company from Eastman Dry Plate and Film Company to Eastman Kodak Company in 1892.

My very first camera was a late 70s Kodak Instamatic with 126 film. It was a gift from my paternal grandmother and it got a lot of use. ~Vic

Additional Reading & Sources:
From The Camera Obscura To The Revolutionary Kodak (Eastman Museum)
Kodak History (Kodak Company)
Kodak Wikipedia

Shutterbug Sunday: Walsenburg

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Walsenburg Sign Image One
Photo Credit: Acts & Tracks (Radio Ronin WordPress Site)

As a companion piece to the Fort Sumner post, my ex-Marine and I headed north, still on our way to Liar’s Lodge. We headed into snow and landed in Walsenburg, Colorado, in Huerfano County, a town smaller than the one I am living in and, as of 2019, continues to hemorrhage people from a peak of 5,855 in 1940. We arrived after dark and stopped to eat. There’s not much there, back then or now. ~Vic

New Mexico Mountains Image Two
Driving north on I-25 through New Mexico.
Click for a larger view.
Mileage Sign Image Three
Las Vegas, New Mexico, by the way…
Driving Into Snow Image Four
The snow showed up.
Click for a larger view.
Snowy Road Image Five
Continuing north.
Click for a larger view.
Empty Diner Image Six
This is from December 2008 but,
the diner looks like it’s from 1974.
Alpine Rose Cafe
Click for a larger view.
Deserted Diner Image Seven
It was open but, deserted.
We had a decent meal.
It’s still there as of 2018.
Click for a larger view.
Radio Station Image Eight
KSPK
It appears to still be there.
It is the only home of Colorado Rockies Baseball
in Southern Colorado.
Huerfano Courthouse Image Nine
County courthouse and jail all lit up.
The lights in the windows are odd.
Click for a larger view.
Snowing Image Ten
It started to snow, again,
while I was attempting another picture.

Additional Reading:
Returning to the Place I’d Never Been (Acts & Tracks/radioronin.wordpress.com)
City of Walsenburg (colorado.gov)
Walsenburg (colorado.com)
Walsenburg (Uncover Colorado)

Shutterbug Saturday: Old Fort Sumner Museum

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I lived in Texas for nearly a decade. My ex-Marine and I did some traveling through the west when we had opportunities. I’ve been digging around in some old stuff and found some photos from a visit to the Old Fort Sumner Museum in New Mexico in December of 2008. We were on our way to Liar’s Lodge. The museum closed in 2017. ~Vic

Old Fort Sumner Museum Image One
A terrible shot of the front of the museum.
It was so overcast.
It never occurred to me to take pictures inside.
Historic Marker Image Two
Official Marker
Lucien Maxwell
Fort Sumner
Bosque Redondo
Elusive Tombstone Image Three
They kept stealing it.
Joe Bowlin
Notice the reference to Texas International Airlines
Jarvis P. Garrett is Pat’s son.
UPI Article on the 1981 Recovery
Stone Marker Image Four
Group death record.
Charlie Bowdre December 23, 1880
Tom O’Folliard December 19, 1880
Billy's Tombstone Image Five
Henry McCarty
AKA William H. Bonney
AKA Billy The Kid
July 14, 1881
“The boy bandit king,
he died as he lived.”

Late Add:

Fort Sumner Cemetery Panorama Image Six
Fort Sumner Cemetery
Photo Credit: Erans World
02-11-2014
Click to view full picture.

Additional Reading:
BTKOG (Billy the Kid Outlaw Gang Site)
Whiskey and the Devil: Taiban, New Mexico (City of Dust Blogspot January 10, 2012)
Billy the Kid’s Two Graves (Roadside America August 15, 2020)
Caught With His Pants Down: Billy the Kid vs Pat Garrett (True West Magazine August 1, 2010)
Brushy Bill Roberts (Wikipedia)

Town Tuesday: Twin Chimneys 1768

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Another one of Hillsborough’s oldest homes. ~Vic

Twin Chimneys Image One
Photo Credit: Library of Congress
Historic American Buildings Survey
February 1965

Twin Chimneys, so named for the paired chimneys in each gable end, is sited on a hill on West King Street, directly across from the Colonial Inn and the Parks-Richmond House […]. An iron gate from Stewart Iron Works in Cincinnati, Ohio, separates the house from the pedestrian traffic of the sidewalk. [It] is reputedly a pre-Revolutionary house, however, the exact date of construction is not known. It is important to note that a house is sited at the exact location on the 1768 Sauthier Map of Hillsborough but, it cannot be assumed that the houses are the same.

Twin Chimneys Image Two
05-20-2019
Twin Chimneys Image Three
07-14-2020
Twin Chimneys Gate Image Four
Left side gate.
Photo Credit: Pinterest

This is a most delightful old house, with four huge chimneys and a second-floor balcony, from which a view of the busy thoroughfare, King Street, may have been enjoyed down through the years. The lot on which it stands was once owned by Edmund Fanning.

It is interesting to know that this house was the setting for the old romantic novel, “Joscelyn Cheshire.” According to the story, the heroine concealed her lover in the attic to protect him from Cornwallis’ army. The house served at one time as Hillsborough’s Post Office.

Archibald DeBow Murphey was a North Carolina politician known as the “Father of Education” in his state for his proposals that benefited public works and public education. [Murphey] died at Twin Chimneys in Hillsborough on February 1, 1832. He is buried at the Presbyterian Church […]. The town of Murphy, North Carolina (despite its spelling) was named after him.

Additional Information & Sources:
Twin Chimneys Photos (Library of Congress)
National Register of Historic Places Inventory (PDF) (North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources)
Twin Chiimneys (Open Orange NC)
Joscelyn Cheshire Full Text (Project Gutenberg)

Twin Chimneys Image Five
06-22-2018

Diane Baker: The Best That It Can Be…

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An Article From: The Chris Thomas Files

Honey Bee Shot Image One
06-28-2020

The Best That It Can Be…
On the face of it, this is a good statement: the positive approach to our life and the way we live it. Why should it, our life, not be the best that it can be?

Three events occurred and, together, they drove my patience out the window. First of all, a friend chatted to me about her concern for her son and daughter-in-law, about how they were working all hours to buy new furniture for their new house and, that every time they came to stay, she had to take all the packaging off the food in her fridge, otherwise, they would throw it out if it was anywhere near its date. Then, I watched Countryfile on the BBC and they were showing how a whole new industry was growing around waste food collection and its use to create energy for our homes. Then, I read an article in Positive News where a tribe in India stood to lose their land because a huge conglomerate wished to mine for bauxite (raw aluminum). This is such a toxic substance that mining for it poisons all the land and the people. The article was in Positive News because the tribe won their case. Sadly, there are many other stories where the outcome is not so happy.

We humans, mostly in the west (I regret to say our influence is spreading), have come to believe we deserve the best. We have interpreted the best it can be into all aspects of our lives. This means we should aspire to the best house, best kitchen, the best car, furniture, clothes, television, computer, mobile phone and, of course, the best food. Our food has Best Before written on it so, subconsciously, we see it is not good enough for us if it is near that date or, that the apple has a blemish or, the potato and cucumber are a bit knobbly…so, we throw it away. [A]re we not worthy of the best?

How Much Does Best Cost?
The consequences of all of these choices are that, currently, the world is at war over mineral rights, (Darfur is only one example of genocide and destruction based on the greed of the west for [minerals] used in mobile phones and other electrical equipment). [M]en and women are used as slave labour to make our clothes, the planet is being carved up and, the rivers polluted for the copper, zinc, etc…to go into our newest, and best, electronic toys […]. Billions of tons of food is thrown away each year because it is considered not to be the best it can be, whilst those that live in the countries that grow our food starve.

Bumblebee Image Two
09-14-2019

I am not advocating a hair shirt, sleeping under a hedge or eating rotten food and starving but, in all things, there is a balance. And, yes, I do have a mobile phone which is second-hand, over six years old and works perfectly for the rare emergency calls I make. The balance is, I do not feel I need to change it every time a new, improved model comes on the market. Millions of mobile phones are put into landfill and are not recycled. The price we may pay for misunderstanding best that it can be… is monumental. There are many people affected by our choices that we never see or think of. The people who grow the food or mine the mineral do so at a very high price. If a people [live] on a land that is rich in minerals, that land will be torn away from them, they will be placed in camps and the reason why, is…you. Our misunderstanding of what makes us special, a success [or] admired, is, now, tightly bound up with possessions, material goods and if I do not have the best and newest of everything, I will be judged a failure.

A Complete Consciousness
It is the best that we can be, as a human and, as a complete consciousness. The best that we are is not made up of, or lack of, possessions. It is about how we live our lives in relation to the rest of the universe and, in particular, with each other. It is we, the so called civilised world, who are so insecure in who we are as souls that we need the third world to be plundered so that we can surround ourselves with our props and say to the world Look. I am worthy. I have the best that there can be.

Think About It
In his book The Human Soul, my husband, Chris Thomas, asks that we Think About It. Think about the consequences your actions will have on others and, then, make the choice that feels right to you. It is your choice and you cannot blame the consequences on anyone else. Everything we buy is made from the planet, itself. This is the planet which has given us the choice of physical life rather than a free-floating soul. Chris has said in his book that we are here to prove that it is possible to have a full soul in physical form and, that, the whole of our existence has been to prove that that is possible. Everything that is happening on Earth, our solar system, our galaxy and the universe beyond, is currently happening in order to help us to be the best human beings we can whilst remaining on Earth. The Human Soul can help you to determine where you are within that process. With Christmas fast approaching, your love and affection to your family without buying something that would cause another family [on] the other side of the world pain and suffering? Think about it. Are you the best that you can be?

Best Wishes,
Diane

© Diane Baker 2010

Cygnus Review Magazine (Issue 12, Page 12, December 2010/Download & Share)
The Blog Post (Cygnus Review Blog…with the wrong author credited)

Town Tuesday: Yellow House 1768

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William Courtney’s Yellow House

This is one of a few of the oldest homes in Hillsborough. ~Vic

William Courtney Yellow House Image One
Downtown Hillsborough
Taken: 04-04-2020
William Courtney Yellow House Image Two
Steps leading from the driveway
to the front door.
Taken: 04-16-2020
William Courtney Yellow House Sign Image Three
Sign Marker

Additional Information:
William Courtney’s Yellow House 1768 (Facebook)
Walk Through Historic Hillsborough (Historic Hillsborough)
William Courtney’s Yellow House (Open Orange NC/Built date is wrong)

Foto Friday: Sky Gazing 5.0

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These are companion shots to my POTD: Sunset post, as well as previous Sky Gazing posts. This town can have some of the most glorious sunsets and quirky cloud formations. ~Vic

Eno River Sunset Image One
Standing on the bridge over the Eno River.
06-24-2020
Sunset Over Garage Image Two
Walking up to the parking garage.
Sunset Over The Trees Image Three
On top of the garage and the colors develop.
Sunset Over The Building Image Four
Sweeping over the adjacent building.
Sunset Over The Town Image Five
Looking out across the town.
Sunset In Full Bloom Image Six
Breathtaking rich colors and contrasts.

Shutterbug Sunday: Solstice Shots

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I dropped the ball and missed posting about our Summer Solstice. I did catch some pictures, though and a Shutterbug Sunday is a perfect reason to post them. I posted about the Solstice in 2018, shortly after I had started blogging, again, after a four year absence. I did an Almanac write-up on the Solstice in 2019. This year’s Solstice occurred at 5:44pm EDT, yesterday. ~Vic

Daisy Group Image One
Daisy Family
Sea Turtle Cloud Image Two
It looks like a Sea Turtle, swimming towards me…sort of…
Cone Flower Image Three
Cone flowers in the Pollinator Garden
Feather Cloud Image Four
Big Feather
New Growth Image Five
New Growth
Bird Flight Image Six
In Flight
Stonehenge Image Seven
Photo Credit: Farmers’ Almanac 1818

Some Folklore:
♦ In ancient Egypt, the summer solstice coincided with the rising of the Nile River. As it was crucial to predict this annual flooding, the Egyptian New Year began at this important solstice.
♦ In centuries past, the Irish would cut hazel branches on solstice eve to be used in searching for gold, water and precious jewels.
♦ Many European cultures hold what are known as Midsummer celebrations at the solstice, which include gatherings at Stonehenge and the lighting of bonfires on hilltops.

Strawberry Moon 2020

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I did a complete write-up on the Strawberry Moon last year with two videos. No need to repeat. Full illumination occurred at 3:12pm EDT. Howl for me! ~Vic

Late add:
I forgot to mention that there was a penumbral eclipse (space.com link) of this Moon but, we weren’t in the path of sight. We will be in the path of sight for the early July eclipse and the late November eclipse.

Gibbous Moon Clouds Image One
Waxing Gibbous with a Sky Eagle
06-01-2020
Gibbous Moon Trees Image Two
Through the limbs.
06-03-2020
Gibbous Moon Trees Image Three
Happy Waxing Gibbous
Gibbous Moon Trees Image Four
Growing Gibbous
06-04-2020
Waning Gibbous At Night Image Five
Clouds moved in.
Little bit of rain.
Spooky
06-05-2020
Waning Gibbous Clouds Image Six
Lovely glow.

Town Tuesday: The Colonial Inn

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Orange Hotel Ad 1867 Image One
Advertisement
1867
Image Credit: Rootsweb

The structure known today as the Colonial Inn was built on Lot 15 in 1838 as a hotel and was locally called Spencer’s Tavern […] but, was advertised as the Orange Hotel (a name which lasted into the 1880s). The structure was built for Isaac (Isaiah) Spencer (from Hyde County) who had purchased the property in late 1837. In 1841, Richardson Nichols purchased the property from Spencer and expanded the main structure. In 1856, Nichols sold the structure to the “Hillsborough Improvement Company” which consisted of Alfred, Henry and Cave Stroud.

Stroud family history has it that Henry’s wife (Sarah) saved the Inn from looting by Union troops by displaying her husband’s Masonic apron. Upon seeing the apron, a sympathetic Union officer, [whom] was a fellow Mason, protected the site from destruction.

The Colonial Inn 1870 Image Two
Strayhorn’s Hotel
1870
Image Credit: Rootsweb

William F. Strayhorn may have purchased or, at least, managed the business beginning in 1868 and, the property was purchased by local businessmen Henry N. Brown and Charles M. Latimer (who was also the county treasurer) in 1870. Brown and Latimer apparently lost the property through bankruptcy in 1872, with Strayhorn managing or operating the hotel until at least then. Perhaps related is that Strayhorn had been living in Twin Chimneys across the street from the hotel but, lost it due to financial problems in January 1869. [It] was purchased by David C. Parks in December 1872. In 1885, Parks sold the property to neighboring property owner Emily Pogue, who sold it back to Parks in 1888. [At] this time, it became known as the Occoneechee Hotel.

The Colonial Inn 1890 Image Three
Looking East
1890s
Image Credit: Rootsweb

In 1908, Thomas A. Corbin purchased the property and renamed the complex the Corbinton Inn. In 1921, W. L. Foushee […] purchased the property from a H. L. Akers and by 1924, renamed the hotel the Colonial Inn. In 1946, Paul Henderson purchased the property from Foushee […].

The Colonial Inn Image Four
Corbinton Inn
1915
Image Credit: Open Orange

During Henderson’s ownership, a “fine-dining” restaurant was added within the hotel structure. In December 1952, Charles and Ann Crawford purchased the property and business and, expanded the structure. They operated the business successfully until they, in turn, sold it to James and Maxine Freeland in 1969. The Freelands also expanded the structure and, continued the hotel and restaurant business at the location.

The Colonial Inn Image Five
Looking WSW
1960s
Photo Credit: Open Orange

It fell into disrepair for many years. When I moved to this town in 2011, it looked bad.

The Colonial Inn Image Six
10-23-2016
The Colonial Inn Image Seven
10-23-2016

The good news is, new owners are re-building. ~Vic

The Colonial Inn 2020 Image Eight
02-29-2020

Additional Information:
The Colonial Inn Hillsborough (Facebook)
Old Town Cemetery (Hillsborough Government Site PDF)
Colonial Inn (Open Orange)
The Colonial Inn 1838-1969 (Rootsweb)
The Colonial Inn: It’s History & Significance (World Now PDF)

Foto Friday: Virus Humor

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We have a few comedians in town. I can appreciate. These are cute and clever. That being said, I am getting tired of the TV telling me to social distance, stay at home and wash my hands. I heard you the first fifty times. Enough already. All photos are my personal collection. © ~Vic

Crownavirus Image One
Sidewalk railing in front of a house on the corner.
The homeowners are known for wiring things
to the railing.
04-15-2020
Crow With Mask Image Two
Crow demonstrates how to wear a mask.
Crow With Bunny Ears Image Three
Crow with bunny ears…and mask.

Jack With Rider Image Four
This is Jack, which, I’m pretty sure
is short for jackass. He is well known
around town. The green critter on his
back is a Disney character, I guess.
04-16-2020

Shutterbug Saturday: Animal Friends 3.0

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Update: I am changing the heading on all of my wildlife posts to Animal Friends. ~Vic

More shots from the local wild babies. All photos are my personal collection. ©.

Animal Friends 2.0

Brown Snake Image One
Saw this little guy on the Riverwalk.
Sadly, it was dead.
It cooked in the sun.
Non-poisonous.
06-02-2019
Mama Deer Image Two
She startled us and we startled her.
07-25-2019
Fawn Image Three
Then, we saw her fawn.
Peek-a-boo!
07-25-2019
Mama & Fawn Image Four
They posed for us for a bit, then took off.
07-25-2019
Green Snake Image Five
This was pitiful.
Victim of a vehicle.
The phone couldn’t capture the brilliant green.
Non-poisonous.
07-29-2019
Fawn Image Six
Hey, Baby!
Seeing spots.
08-17-2019