eno river

Shutterbug Saturday: Feathers Part IV

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Feather Image One
Photo Credit: George Becker on Pexels

In my last post on March 2, I was talking about sitting under my Hackberry tree and getting pelted with debris from a little woodpecker above me. I tried to get some shots of him but, they weren’t clear enough. My S7 just doesn’t do well with distance. That’s OK. I have other stuff.

Part I
Part II
Part III

Cardinal Image Two
From the Den window.
02-19-2019
Cardinal Image Three
And, he looked at the camera.
Geese Image Four
Geese coming up from the river.
04-16-2019
Geese Image Five
And, headed to a neighbor’s backyard.
Geese Image Six
They are such a cute pair.
Boot Birdhouse Image Seven
I haven’t seen any activity…yet. 05-06-2019

Shutterbug Saturday: Frog Strangler Part I

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Or, Toad Strangler or, Gully Washer… My dad was fond of the frog saying and my maternal grandfather always used the latter. All three are good descriptions of the storm that just swept through here, today. I haven’t seen this much water since Hurricane Matthew in 2016. Have mercy… ~Vic

Rain Storm Image One
I thought my chairs might float away.
The backdoor neighbor had his own mini-river.
Rain Storm Image Two
Patio at the side door looks like a mini-swimming pool.
Water from the next door neighbor’s poor drainage…
Rain Storm Image Three
The gold pick-up in the first photo…this is his backyard.
The Eno hasn’t crested, yet and, the water is at his backdoor right now.
Rain Storm Image Four
Bench at Turnip Patch Park didn’t fare well.
Rain Storm Image Five
Entrance to Gold Park underwater.
One sewer access is over-flowing.
Rain Storm Image Six
Underwater graffiti.
See my previous post on this.
Picture #2

More to come…

Foto Friday: Tuesday Evening Trek Part II

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I suppose I should have labeled the first post as Part I but…I neglected. Oh, well… All photos are my personal collection except the very last one. ~Vic

Tuesday Trek Image One
03-12-2019
Portrait angle of the same flower gathering.
Tuesday Trek Image Two
Opposite angle of that big tree.
Tuesday Trek Image Three
Setting sun.
Another flower group.
Bizarre rock pile beyond that.
Tuesday Trek Image Four
There are so many trails that run along the Eno.
So many lovely views…
Tuesday Trek Image Five
I can almost feel the sun’s warmth from this shot.
Tuesday Trek Image Six
Odd porcupine-looking tree formation.
Tuesday Trek Image Seven
What’s left of the old Eno River Pumping Station.
Open Durham Image Eight
Image Credit: opendurham.org
You can see the rock formation I had to climb over on the right.
All that’s left is the base.
Circa 1905

Tuesday Evening Trek

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Dunnagan Trail Image One
All Photos Are My Personal Collection
03-12-2019
Flower garden along the Dunnagan Trail Loop.
Dunnagan Trail Image Two
That was one big tree.
Dunnagan Trail Image Three
Entry bridge.
Dunnagan Trail Imge Four
The tiny Dunnagan cemetery.
Dunnagan Trail Image Five
Catharine Link Dunnagan
03-07-1826 to 01-06-1914
Just missed her birthday…
Dunnagan Trail Image Six
Setting sun over the Eno.
Dunnagan Trail Image Seven
I had to climb over that rock formation to the right.
I’m not as agile as I used to be.

This was a two-mile hike after an early dinner. More to come… ~Vic

Autumnal Equinox 2018

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A beautiful moth in the butterfly garden of Gold Park.

Image One
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

These golden beauties line the walkway at Gold Park.

Image Two
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

These look like a distant cousin of Coreopsis.

Image Three
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

Baby pine tree.

Image Four
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

That is a handcrafted bee hotel at Gold Park.

Image Five
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

One week ago, the Eno was completely out of its banks.

Image Six
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

Soothing sounds. I could listen to this all day.

 

It was a wonderful walk. There was a breeze and the temperature was in the higher 80s instead of the 90s. Fall is finally here. The local trees’ leaves aren’t changing color just yet but, many are ‘leaf dropping’, including the huge Maple tree in my front yard. I sat in my Adirondack for a couple of hours, journaling. I look forward to the mosquitoes leaving. They are still here. ~Victoria

The Autumnal Equinox for this area of the Northern Hemisphere was at 9:54pm EDT.

From www.almanac.com:

Why is it called ‘an equinox’?
The word comes from the Latin aequus, meaning “equal” and nox, meaning “night”.

During the equinox, the Sun crosses what we call the “celestial equator”. Imagine a line that marks the equator on Earth extending up into the sky above the equator from north to south. Earth’s two hemispheres receive the Sun’s rays about equally. The Sun is overhead at noon as seen from the equator, so at this point, the amount of nighttime and daytime (sunlight) are roughly equal to each other.

Fun Facts & Myths

From www.timeanddate.com:

The Snake of Sunlight
A famous ancient equinox celebration was the Mayan sacrificial ritual by the main pyramid at Chichen Itza, Mexico. The pyramid, known as El Castillo, has 4 staircases running from the top to the bottom of the pyramid’s faces, notorious for the bloody human sacrifices that used to take place here. The staircases are built at a carefully calculated angle which makes it look like an enormous snake of sunlight slithers down the stairs on the day of the equinox.

Other Customs