gold park

Shutterbug Saturday: Animal Friends 3.0

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Update: I am changing the heading on all of my wildlife posts to Animal Friends. ~Vic

More shots from the local wild babies. All photos are my personal collection. ©.

Animal Friends 2.0

Brown Snake Image One
Saw this little guy on the Riverwalk.
Sadly, it was dead.
It cooked in the sun.
Non-poisonous.
06-02-2019
Mama Deer Image Two
She startled us and we startled her.
07-25-2019
Fawn Image Three
Then, we saw her fawn.
Peek-a-boo!
07-25-2019
Mama & Fawn Image Four
They posed for us for a bit, then took off.
07-25-2019
Green Snake Image Five
This was pitiful.
Victim of a vehicle.
The phone couldn’t capture the brilliant green.
Non-poisonous.
07-29-2019
Fawn Image Six
Hey, Baby!
Seeing spots.
08-17-2019

Foto Friday: Sky Gazing

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Flick Friday is a bust. No releases for today. So, it’s another installment of Foto Friday. Submitted for your approval…my walk this evening. ~Vic

See Sunsets Local as well.

Sunset Over Garden Image One
Capturing the sunset in the Butterfly Garden
at Gold Park
Waxing Crescent Moon Image Two
Waxing crescent Moon above the pines.
Glowing With The Moon Image Three
A glow beside the Moon.
Sky Fire Image Four
Sky on fire.
Pink Glow Image Five
Pink glow amid the wild flowers.

Shutterbug Saturday: Critter Collections 7.0

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All Things Critter
All photos are my personal collection. ~Vic
Part I/Part II/Part III/Part IV/Part V/Part VI

Grasshopper Image One
Big grasshopper.
Taken with my old Samsung Alias II.
Nature Preserve
Round Rock, TX
10-25-2008
Lizard Image Two
Another shot of the blue tail.
05-06-2019
Tiny Bee Image Three
Tiny bee in my side yard.
05-13-2019
Ladybug Image Four
On the Riverwalk, headed to Gold Park.
Love the Ladybugs.
05-13-2019
Dragonfly Image Five
Dragonfly in the Butterfly Garden.
He looks like a Skivvy Waver.
05-17-2019
Wolf Spider Image Six
Wolf spider running on the Riverwalk.
05-19-2019
Bumblebees Image Seven
Hungry Bumbles
05-31-2019
Preying Mantis Image Eight
Young Preying Mantis on a Black-Eyed Susan.
Riverwalk
05-31-2019

Shutterbug Saturday: Rogue Artistes 3.0

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The creative elves are back at it with more graffiti. If concrete or wood is bare, they have a canvas. All photos are my personal collection. © ~Vic

Part I/Part II

Anarchy Man-hole Image One
Anarchy!
Even man-hole openings need decoration.
04-15-2019
Crying Man-hole Image Two
Crying man-hole.
Maybe its the smell?
04-22-2019
Happy Man-hole Image Three
Happy man-hole.
This one must smell better.
05-07-2019
Love Animals Image Four
Love animals.
Covered walkway to Gold Park.
05-17-2019
Save Earth Image Five
Save Earth.
Go Vegan Image Six
Go vegan.

Shutterbug Saturday: Frog Strangler 2.0

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We continue to have stormy, rainy weather and the temperature has dropped, considerably. We traded floods for tornadoes, yesterday. I learned, today, that two small farms south of town were damaged. I have a healthy respect for Mother Nature. ~Vic

See Part I

Rain Storm Image One
Swollen drainage ditch to the river.
This helped flood my neighbor's backyard.
04-13-2019
Rain Storm Image Two
The tiny creek at Turnip Patch Park took out one of the benches.
Rain Storm Image Three
The Riverwalk is to the far right.
The town closed it for a couple of days.
I saw a juvenile garter snake making its way back across the walk when I was out on the third day.
Rain Storm Image Four
Train trestle in the background.
Rain Storm Image Five
The wooden fence is a barrier between Gold Park & the Eno.
Rain Storm Image Six
That is the bridge I was standing on to photograph the Riverwalk & the trestle.

Pink Moon 2019

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Ok. So. No full moon pix for today. *sigh* We have been inundated with storms…again. We were bombarded with tornado warnings for five hours. An area just south of town close to I-40 was damaged. I am so glad it’s over.

That being said, I do have some shots of the waxing gibbous moon from April 28, 2018. I suspect I had the same problem during that full moon on April 29 (8:58pm EDT)…bad weather. I also have some waxing gibbous shots from April 16.

Howl for me! ~Vic

Pink Moon 2019 was at 100% illumination at 7:12am EDT.

Pink Moon Image One
Downtown walk.
Waxing Gibbous.
04-28-2018

From Moon Giant:

April’s full moon is widely known as the Full Pink Moon, even though it doesn’t actually turn pastel pink as the name suggests. The Full Pink Moon’s name comes from the abundance of moss phlox, a common little pink flower that typically begins to spread across the ground in early spring. With that said, this creeping phlox is not the only thing that begins blooming during the Full Pink Moon.

In many Native American tribes, April’s full moon is associated with the bustling life and vibrant growth of spring. In Sioux culture, it’s named after the sprouting of red grass. The Comanche tribe called it the New Spring Moon and, both the Tlingit and Sioux tribes referred to it as the Budding Moon, after the new plants that begin to bud and sprout during spring. The Cherokee tribe even called it the Flower Moon (though that name is also sometimes used to refer to May’s full moon) and celebrated it for the growth of useful medicinal plants and magical herbs.

Pink Moon Image Two
Walking back home.

At the same time, April is a time when rivers and streams begin to fully thaw. Accordingly, the Shoshone tribe named April’s full moon the Full Melting Moon and the Arapaho tribe called it the Moon Where Ice Breaks in the River. It was also known as the Fish Moon because of the fish that would begin to swim upstream during this time. The Cherokees believed that flowing water was under the control of a spirit called the Long Man and would perform rituals to honor him during the Full Pink Moon. An example of a ritual like this was the Knee Deep Dance, based off the movements of the Water Frog. The Assiniboine tribe also called April’s full moon the Frog Moon.

Water is not the only thing that starts to flow during the Full Pink Moon. This is also the time where maple sap begins to flow in earnest, marking the true beginning of the incredibly important sugar-making season. The Abenaki tribes called April’s full moon the Sugar Maker Moon, and the Ojibwe called it the Sugarbush Moon. The Ojibwe tribe would journey north to their spring camps to tap maple syrup and engage in spear fishing. Maple syrup was integral to Ojibwe culture. Not only was it a crucial method of seasoning all their foods (they did not have access to salt at that time) but, it also symbolized harmony within the community and with the forces of nature around them.

Pink Moon Image Three
Gold Park
Waxing Gibbous
04-16-2019

The Full Pink Moon also holds religious significance in other cultures. For example, in Islāmic communities around the world, April’s full moon is celebrated as Bara’at Night, also known as the Night of Innocence. Muslims offer up prayers, asking God to absolve dead ancestors of their sins. They also prepare sweet desserts such as halwa or zarda and give it out to children, the needy and other members of their community. Meanwhile, Christians call it the Paschal Moon and celebrate the first Sunday after April’s full moon as Easter Sunday. It’s possible that the reason why the Easter Bunny brings eggs is because April’s full moon is also known as the Egg Moon, given that animals such as geese begin mating and laying eggs in spring.

Pink Moon Image Four
Riverwalk

From Farmers Almanac:

While April is known for its showers and ever-warming temperatures, it is also known as a month when spring flowers begin to show up. The name came from the herb moss pink or wild ground phlox which is one of the earliest widespread flowers of the spring. As the name infers, the flowers are pink in color, thus the name for April’s full Moon. But no, the Moon itself won’t be turning pink.

Tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Full Moon names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the full Moon names but, in general, the same ones were consistent among regional tribes. European settlers followed that custom and created some of their own names.

Other names for this month’s celestial body include the Full Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon and, among coastal tribes the Full Fish Moon, because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn.

Also referred to as:
Grass Moon
Hare Moon

Western Washington University Native American Moons
American Indian Moon Names

Shutterbug Saturday: Frog Strangler

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Or, Toad Strangler or, Gully Washer… My dad was fond of the frog saying and my maternal grandfather always used the latter. All three are good descriptions of the storm that just swept through here, today. I haven’t seen this much water since Hurricane Matthew in 2016. Have mercy… ~Vic

Rain Storm Image One
I thought my chairs might float away.
The backdoor neighbor had his own mini-river.
Rain Storm Image Two
Patio at the side door looks like a mini-swimming pool.
Water from the next door neighbor’s poor drainage…
Rain Storm Image Three
The gold pick-up in the first photo…this is his backyard.
The Eno hasn’t crested, yet and, the water is at his backdoor right now.
Rain Storm Image Four
Bench at Turnip Patch Park didn’t fare well.
Rain Storm Image Five
Entrance to Gold Park underwater.
One sewer access is over-flowing.
Rain Storm Image Six
Underwater graffiti.
See my previous post on this.
Picture #2

More to come…

Shutterbug Saturday: Critter Collections

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Nature’s wonderful creatures with many legs or, none at all. All photos are my personal collection. ~Vic

Texas Brown Image One
Juvenile Texas Brown Tarantula
Found the little guy in our shed in the backyard (mating season).
I had trouble snapping his picture as he kept moving and I kept jumping.
09-10-2008
Texas Brown Image Two
Gentle spiders.
We turned him over to a friend who had Tarantulas as pets.
Red Verbena Image Three
Butterfly enjoying a Red Verbena.
Nature Preserve in Round Rock, TX.
10-25-2008
Red Dragonfly Image Four
Red Dragonfly
Nature Preserve.
Moth On Salvia Image Five
Beautiful moth on a Salvia in the Butterfly Garden at Gold Park.
06-20-2013
Orange Worm Image Six
Big, fast-moving worm…of some sort.
He had places to go.
08-30-2013
Orange Worm Image Seven
He looks like a carrot.
Moth In Window Image Eight
Moth in the dirty window of a friend’s house. 08-01-2014

More to come…

Autumnal Equinox 2018

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A beautiful moth in the butterfly garden of Gold Park.

Image One
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

These golden beauties line the walkway at Gold Park.

Image Two
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

These look like a distant cousin of Coreopsis.

Image Three
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

Baby pine tree.

Image Four
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

That is a handcrafted bee hotel at Gold Park.

Image Five
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

One week ago, the Eno was completely out of its banks.

Image Six
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

Soothing sounds. I could listen to this all day.

 

It was a wonderful walk. There was a breeze and the temperature was in the higher 80s instead of the 90s. Fall is finally here. The local trees’ leaves aren’t changing color just yet but, many are ‘leaf dropping’, including the huge Maple tree in my front yard. I sat in my Adirondack for a couple of hours, journaling. I look forward to the mosquitoes leaving. They are still here. ~Victoria

The Autumnal Equinox for this area of the Northern Hemisphere was at 9:54pm EDT.

From www.almanac.com:

Why is it called ‘an equinox’?
The word comes from the Latin aequus, meaning “equal” and nox, meaning “night”.

During the equinox, the Sun crosses what we call the “celestial equator”. Imagine a line that marks the equator on Earth extending up into the sky above the equator from north to south. Earth’s two hemispheres receive the Sun’s rays about equally. The Sun is overhead at noon as seen from the equator, so at this point, the amount of nighttime and daytime (sunlight) are roughly equal to each other.

Fun Facts & Myths

From www.timeanddate.com:

The Snake of Sunlight
A famous ancient equinox celebration was the Mayan sacrificial ritual by the main pyramid at Chichen Itza, Mexico. The pyramid, known as El Castillo, has 4 staircases running from the top to the bottom of the pyramid’s faces, notorious for the bloody human sacrifices that used to take place here. The staircases are built at a carefully calculated angle which makes it look like an enormous snake of sunlight slithers down the stairs on the day of the equinox.

Other Customs

Summer Solstice 2018

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Sun Rays Photo
From My Personal Collection

The Summer Solstice for the Northern Hemisphere was, officially, at 6:07am EDT. It is the longest day of the year. It was a fine day for small tasks, discussing work with my boss, playing with Oliver, taking a walk with a close friend, waiting for rain that never showed up, enjoying a ginger ale while reading and being thankful that I managed to avoid the evening news. 🙄

Oliver Photo
Ollie the 18lbs orange Hemingway (I have thumbs!)

I covet peace and quiet. I covet calm. I see so little of it on a television. I try to keep it on a soothing music channel so I can function.

I was fortunate enough while walking to catch a clear glimpse of our waxing gibbous Moon, 61% illumination, before the clouds moved in for the non-existent rain. I neglected to get a shot of it. I normally chase good renderings of full moons, which is a task with a smartphone. Nothing really matches the rich textures of a camera with real film. I feel the same way about LPs/records. Digital will never capture the tones and depth of analog recordings. And, I’m showing my age. Heh.

River Seat Photo
From My Personal Collection

It was in the low 90s. That is just too high for June to suit me. Had to wait until 6:00pm to wander out. I do love the local Riverwalk.

Deer Photo
Local Deer

I understand that there was a gathering at Stonehenge. I would have loved to have been there.

~Victoria