walt disney

TV Tuesday: Walt Disney World Summer Jam Concert 2000

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Summer Jam Concert Image
Image Credit: My TV Log Blog

Twenty years ago, today, the Walt Disney World Summer Jam Concert aired on ABC at 8:00pm EDT on a Friday night. The concert was in Orlando, FL and hosted by Christina Aguilera. Directed by Jeff Palmer, performers were Aguilera, Enrique Iglesias, Smash Mouth, Destiny’s Child and BBMak.

Songs performed:

What a Girl Wants (Aguilera)
All Star (Smash Mouth)
Be with You (Iglesias)
Say My Name (Destiny’s Child)
I Turn to You (Aguilera)
Then the Morning Comes (Smash Mouth)
Back Here (BBMak)
Genie in a Bottle (Aguilera)
Jumpin’, Jumpin’ (Destiny’s Child)
Bailamos (Iglesias)

There is not a lot written about this. ~Vic

Sources:
Walt Disney World Summer Jam Concert (IMDB)
Walt Disney World Summer Jam Concert (Paley Center for Media)
Walt Disney World Summer Jam Concert (Turner Classic Movies Database)

Genie in a Bottle

Say My Name & Jumpin’ Jumpin’

TV Tuesday: Daniel Boone 1964

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Daniel Boone Wallpaper Image One
Image Credit: The TV Database

Fifty-five years ago, today, the actionadventure series Daniel Boone debuted on NBC. Produced by 20th Century Fox Television, it starred Fess Parker, Patricia Blair, Darby Hinton, Veronica Cartwright, Ed Ames & Dallas McKennon. Country singer Jimmy Dean was a guest star for fifteen episodes from 1968-1970 and NFL football player Rosie Greer had regular appearances from 1969-1970. The show’s first season was in black & white.

From Wikipedia:

Daniel Boone was one of two significant historical figures played by Fess Parker. He previously appeared as Davy Crockett in a series of episodes of the Walt Disney anthology television series […]. Efforts had been made to secure the rights to Crockett from Walt Disney but, Disney refused to sell, so, the series wound up being about Boone instead. In contrast, Parker’s Boone was less of an explorer and more a family man than Parker’s Crockett. Parker as Crockett also generally wore a light beard, whereas his Boone was predominantly clean-shaven.

The series is set in the 1770s and 1780s, just before, during and after the American Revolution and, mostly centered on adventures in, and about, Boonesborough, Kentucky. Some aspects of the show were less than historically faithful, which, at one point, led the Kentucky legislature to condemn the inaccuracies. The series’ story line does not follow historical events. Instead, story lines run back and forth concerning historical events.

Daniel Boone Image Two
Photo Credit: imdb.com

[Ed Ames] role as Mingo led to a famous tomahawk-throwing demonstration on The Tonight Show, that was rerun on anniversary clip shows for decades afterward, in which Ames threw a tomahawk at a target of a man and the hatchet landed between the cutout’s legs, much to host Johnny Carson‘s amusement.

More Background Information

Trivia Bits:
♦ According to an interview with Veronica Cartwright, she left the series because the producers wanted to have her character of Jemima Boone involved in more mature situations, such as budding romantic relationships. Patricia Blair did not like this because it made her feel too old, so she threatened to leave the series if Cartwright was not let go from the series.
♦ Israel Boone was one of seventy-two killed at the Battle of Blue Licks, one of the last battles of the Revolutionary War, on August 19, 1782. He was twenty-three. His father Daniel was there and saw his son killed. Coincidentally, Darby Hinton, who played Israel, was born on the 175th Anniversary of Israel’s death, August 19, 1957.
♦ [The] Boones [actually] had ten children […].
♦ Unlike Fess Parker [6’5″ 1/2], the real Daniel Boone was only about 5’8″.

Movie Monday: Sleeping Beauty 1959

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Sleeping Beauty Image One
Image Credit: imdb.com & amazon.com

Sixty years ago, today, the most popular film at the box office was Sleeping Beauty.
Voice Cast:
Mary Costa…….Princess Aurora
Bill Shirley…….Prince Phillip
Eleanor Audley…….Maleficent
Verna Felton…….Flora/Queen Leah
Barbara Luddy…….Merryweather
Barbara Jo Allen…….Fauna
Taylor Holmes…….King Stefan
Bill Thompson…….King Hubert

IMDB Summary:

After a beautiful princess, Aurora, is born in to royalty everyone gathers to exchange gifts. Everything is perfectly fine until an unwanted guest appears, Maleficent. Maleficent casts a spell on the young princess and announces that she will die by pricking her finger on the spindle of a spinning wheel on the evening of her 16th birthday. Fortunately, one of the good fairies, Merryweather, changes the spell so Aurora will fall asleep, and that the only way to wake her from her sleep is true love’s kiss. Finally the day comes.

The Sleeping Beauty story has many variations and has deep, medieval roots. Disney’s movie was based on French author Charles Perrault’s La Belle Au Bois Dormant (German: Dornröschen or Little Briar Rose) or, in English, The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods, written in the late 1600s.

Sleeping Beauty Image Two
Image Credit: imdb.com & amazon.com

Other Perrault works include Le Petit Chaperon Rouge (Little Red Riding Hood), Cendrillon (Cinderella), Le Chat Botté (Puss in Boots) and Barbe Bleue (Bluebeard). Perrault’s literary tales predate the Brothers Grimm material by 100+ years but, The Sleeping Beauty, in particular, was based on the Sun, Moon & Talia (Sole, Luna, e Talia) piece by Italian writer Giambattista Basile, published, posthumously, in the early 1600s. This would NOT be a good children’s fairy tale.

Perceforest, a collection of six French books from the middle 1300s, with ties to the Arthurian Legend, appears to be the earliest written form of the story.

Trivia Bits:
♦ Princess Aurora’s long, thin, willowy body shape was inspired by that of Audrey Hepburn.
♦ The prince is named after Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh and husband of Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain, as well as Prince Philip of Belgium (now King Philip).
♦ This is the only Disney movie with square trees.
♦ Famed Warner Bros. animation director Chuck Jones worked on the film, briefly, when Termite Terrace closed temporarily during the late 1950s. He found the atmosphere at Walt Disney Productions oppressive because everything anyone did there had to be approved by Walt Disney before, during and, after the process of production. He was more than happy when Warner’s animation department re-opened, where he stayed until it closed again in 1964.

Five Nominations & One Award