cardinal

Shutterbug Saturday: Feathers 5.0

Posted on

I used to add a corresponding photo from Unsplash or Pexels up at the top as a lead-in. I have enough photos of my own so, I won’t be doing that anymore. My previous posts, I will leave them. All photos are my personal collection. © ~Vic

Feathers 4.0

Cardinal Image One
Cardinal singing on the Riverwalk
04-18-2019
Cardinal Image Two
Tail Feathers
Carolina Wren Image Three
Carolina Wren out of the nest.
The nest is the black washtub to the left.
04-24-2019
Carolina Wren Image Four
Calling for its mate.
Carolina Wren Image Five
Then, it started to bark at a squirrel.
Washtub Image Six
The washtub is full.
Washtub Image Seven
Nesting material.
Birdhouse Image Eight
This one was just not big enough,
even for the little Wrens.
05-06-2019

Summer Solstice 2019

Posted on

I did a post last year, celebrating the Summer Solstice of 2018. I got some really cool pictures that day. I got a few this year with some visitations from nature.

If anyone can identify my caterpillar, let me know. ~Vic

Solstice Sun Image
From my Adirondack chair in the side yard.
Cardinal Image Two
Young Cardinal checking things out.
Caterpillar Image Three
Fuzzy, green caterpillar that I can’t identify.
I tried.
Crawled up on my chair.

National Day Calendar Image Four

The Summer Solstice for our area of the planet was at 11:45am EDT.

The word “solstice” comes from Latin solstitium — from sol (Sun) and stitium (still or stopped), reflecting the fact that on the solstice, the Sun appears to stop “moving” in the sky as it reaches its northern or, southernmost point (declination) for the year, as seen from Earth. After the solstice, the Sun appears to reverse course and head back in the opposite direction. The motion referred to here is the apparent path of the Sun when one views its position in the sky at the same time each day, for example at local noon. Over the year, its path forms a sort of flattened figure eight, called an analemma. Of course, the Sun, itself, is not moving (unless you consider its own orbit around the Milky Way Galaxy). Tnstead, this change in position in the sky that we on Earth notice is caused by the tilt of Earth’s axis as it orbits the Sun, as well as Earth’s elliptical, rather than circular, orbit. The timing of the June solstice is not based on a specific calendar date or time. It all depends on when the Sun reaches its northernmost point from the equator.

Did you know that the Sun actually sets more slowly around the time of a solstice, in that it takes longer to set below the horizon? This is related to the angle of the setting Sun. The farther the Sun sets from due west along the horizon, the shallower the angle of the setting Sun. (Conversely, it’s faster at or near the equinoxes.) Bottom-line, enjoy those long romantic summertime sunsets at or near the solstice!

Many cultures, both ancient and modern, celebrate the sunlight with rituals and holidays. Every year on the summer solstice, thousands of people travel to Wiltshire, England, to Stonehenge […]. There are many Midsummer celebrations all over the planet.

[Source]

POTD: Cardinal

Posted on

I saw the Cardinal thru the Den window. It was perched on one of the torches. Just as I took the shot, he took off. I was pleasantly surprised to capture him diving relatively clearly. ~Vic

Cardinal In Flight Image
04-09-2019

Shutterbug Saturday: Tribute Pictures 2.0

Posted on Updated on

Pennybacker Bridge Image One
Photo Credit: Ryan Barron on Unsplash
The Percy V. Pennybacker, Jr., Bridge on Loop 360, Capital of Texas Highway, Austin

In my previous post from November 24, I spoke of my former supervisor, W. H. Patton, whom I worked for, and with, from September of 2002 until he retired in May of 2007. This is Part Two of a five-part series. Below are more of his photography works.

Bobcats Image Two
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his ranch in 2007, a pair of Bobcats
Bobcat Image Three
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his driveway, 09-16-2008
Bobcat Image Four
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his driveway, 09-16-2008
Bobcat Image Five
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his backyard, 09-16-2008
Mockingbirds Image Six
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his back patio, The Quartet 08-10-2008
Mockingbirds Image Seven
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his back patio, The Texas State Bird Chorus & a couple of wasps 08-10-2008
Cardinal Image Eight
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his back patio, 07-23-2007
Rabbit Image Nine
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his backyard, 07-23-2007