austin

Song Sunday: Desperate But Not Serious

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Adam Ant Image One
Image Credit: lettiemusic.wordpress.com

“If you don’t stop, you will go blind…”

Rolling down the Samsung playlist for a Sunday evening submission, we come to Adam Ant or, Stuart Leslie Goddard and Desperate But Not Serious. The fourth track from the album Friend or Foe, it was co-written by Goddard and Marco Pirroni and, released November 19, 1982, the third single from his solo debut. This is the album that brought us Goody Two Shoes that went to number #1 in Australia and the UK. Desperate didn’t fare as well peaking at #33 in the UK and #66 on Billboard’s Hot 100.

I bought the album as a cassette and nearly wore it out. This is what I term as eclectic music. It’s different, it’s catchy, Goddard has a crazy voice that he plays to the hilt and the writing is very coy and, tongue-in-cheek. He will be at The Paramount Theatre in Austin, Texas, April 28, 2021. I’ve been to that venue many times. I would love to see him there.

I hope you enjoy

Music Monday: Messe de Nostre Dame 1360s

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Kyrie da Missa Image One
The Kyrie
Image Credit: wikipedia.org &
wikimedia.org
Author: manuscrito sob a
supervisão do autor

I’m still digging around in the old stuff. I found this piece and thought it interesting.

From Wikipedia:

Messe de Nostre Dame (Mass of Our Lady) is a polyphonic mass composed before 1365 by French poet and composer Guillaume de Machaut […]. Widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of medieval music, and of all religious music, it is historically notable as the earliest complete setting of the Ordinary of the Mass attributable to a single composer […].

It’s Structure:

The Messe de Nostre Dame consists of 5 movements: the Kyrie (Eleison…”Lord, have mercy”), Gloria (in Excelsis Deo…”Glory to God in the highest”), Credo (Nicene Creed), Sanctus (“Holy”) and Agnus Dei (“Lamb of God”), followed by the dismissal Ite, missa est (Mass Response: Deo Gratias or “Thanks be to God”). The tenor of the Kyrie is based on Vatican Kyrie IV, the Sanctus and Agnus correspond to Vatican Mass XVII and the Ite is on Sanctus VIII. The Gloria and Credo have no apparent chant basis, although they are stylistically related to one another. Machaut’s Messe de Nostre Dame is for four voices rather than the more common three. Machaut added a contratenor voice that moved in the same low range as the tenor, sometimes replacing it as the lowest voice.

The information is rather wonky and, not only have I never studied music theory, my education on Catholic Mass is limited to a short stint as a member in an Anglican church in Austin, TX, a decade ago. That being said, what I find fascinating about this composition is that Machaut combined each part into an artistic whole, the earliest known example of it unified. Previously, the items were performed non-consecutively and, separated by prayers and chants.

[Instrumental Version of The Kyrie by Guillaume de Machaut]

[Modern Take on Kyrie by Patrick Lenk]

And, just because I could, I’m ending with Mr. Mister.

Shutterbug Saturday: Tribute Pictures 2.0

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Pennybacker Bridge Image One
Photo Credit: Ryan Barron on Unsplash
The Percy V. Pennybacker, Jr., Bridge on Loop 360, Capital of Texas Highway, Austin

In my previous post from November 24, I spoke of my former supervisor, W. H. Patton, whom I worked for, and with, from September of 2002 until he retired in May of 2007. This is Part Two of a five-part series. Below are more of his photography works.

Bobcats Image Two
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his ranch in 2007, a pair of Bobcats
Bobcat Image Three
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his driveway, 09-16-2008
Bobcat Image Four
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his driveway, 09-16-2008
Bobcat Image Five
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his backyard, 09-16-2008
Mockingbirds Image Six
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his back patio, The Quartet 08-10-2008
Mockingbirds Image Seven
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his back patio, The Texas State Bird Chorus & a couple of wasps 08-10-2008
Cardinal Image Eight
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his back patio, 07-23-2007
Rabbit Image Nine
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his backyard, 07-23-2007

Shutterbug Saturday: Tribute Pictures

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Congress Avenue Image One
Photo Credit: Ryan Wallace on Unsplash
Texas State Capitol Building

I lived and worked in Texas for nearly a decade. I was fortunate enough to snag a Texas State job for the majority of the time I was there. The gentleman that interviewed and hired me was, as it turns out, my immediate Supervisor. He was one of the best bosses I ever had (his replacement after retirement was just as terrific). He did his job and he let me do mine. We sometimes rode the bus together, to and from work (downtown Austin).

I grew to love this man. He was a lanky 6′ 6″ and spoke fluent Spanish with a Texan accent. He had to have heart valve surgery a decade before I met him and, when you got close to him, he ticked like a clock. He owned a ranch just outside of Abilene in a small town called Clyde. He was a cattleman, a businessman, a photographer, a writer, an artist, a musician, a pilot, interviewed two U.S. Presidents and, was good friends with Mac Davis, Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton. He graduated Texas Tech with a Journalism degree, loved the Red Raiders and served in the U.S. Army Reserves:

“I protected Fort Leonard Wood, MO, from all enemies, foreign and domestic, during the Cuban missile crisis” ~ W. H. Patton

He lived all over the U.S. and Mexico. He moved to the Austin area in 1997 and I met him in 2002. He always had a story to tell and had a wicked sense of humor. He was one hell of a cook and drank like a fish. I am thankful that I met him and am a better person for it. He passed away in 2012, five days after his 73rd birthday. I’d like to share some of his work, as he shared it with me.

Azaleas Image Two
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From the 1960s, his son fishing.
Barn Owl Image Three
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From the 1960s, he managed to capture the image of a Barn Owl in an abandoned house.
Geese Image Four
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From the 1960s, local geese.
Kodiak Bear Image Five
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From the 1960s, Kodiak bear.
Wood Duck Image Six
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From the 1960s, a wood duck.
Hummingbird Image Seven
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his backyard, 04-08-2008
Dove Art Image Eight
W. H. Patton pencil rendering…1977
Eagle Image Nine
W. H. Patton pencil rendering…1977