march 7

Snapshots Sunday: Rogue Artistes 6.0

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It’s been over two years since I posted some local art work. Previous post, here. ~Vic

Ceramic Collage Image One
Ceramic Tile Collage
Town Parking Garage
10-07-2020
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Daisies & Butterfly Image Two
Underpass Column
Lovely Drawing
04-26-2020
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Groovy Dude Image Three
Underpass Wall
I see Morgan Freeman.
Who do you see?
03-13-2020
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Day of the Dead Masks Image Four
Underpass Wall
Day of the Dead Masks?
03-07-2020
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Billy Strayhorn Mural Image Five
Billy Strayhorn Mural
09-13-2019
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Historical Marker Image Six
Historical Marker
More Information On Strayhorn
09-13-2019
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VOTD: Crazy Clock

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Time waits for no one, particularly when you have a fresh battery and stripped gears. ~Vic



Video of the Day

Throwback Thursday: Bloody Sunday 1965

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Bloody Sunday Image
Photo Credit: nbcnews.com

Fifty-four years ago, today, the First March of the Selma to Montgomery marches took place. The planned marches were a response to the murder of Jimmie Lee Jackson by Alabama State Trooper James Fowler. Fowler shot Jackson on February 18, 1965, during a clash between, approximately, 500 protestors walking to Perry County Jail for James Orange and, Marion police officers, sheriff’s deputies and the state troopers. Jackson died from his injuries on February 26. Other casualties that night were two UPI photographers and NBC News correspondent Richard Valereani.

Bloody Sunday Image Two
Photo Credit: usatoday.com

The death of Jackson motivated James Bevel “to initiate and organize the first Selma to Montgomery march to present a way for the citizens of Marion and Selma to direct the anger over Jackson’s death into a positive outcome.Amelia Boynton assisted with the planning.

As the demonstrators crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, state, and county police, stopped the march and beat the protesters. Boynton was knocked unconscious and the photograph of her wounded body got the entire world’s attention.

The second march took place on March 9, referred to as Turnaround Tuesday. Though the march was peaceful due to a court order declaring no police interference, James Reeb was murdered that evening.

The third march to Montgomery spanned March 21 through March 24. By Thursday, March 25, the movement had reached the State Capitol Building. The murder of Viola Liuzzo was the final end to the violence and the 18 day struggle. Her murder, however, uncovered an FBI Informant, exposing J. Edgar Hoover‘s illegal activities.

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was signed into law on August 6, 1965 and, the march route, the Selma To Montgomery Voting Rights Trail, is a designated National Historic Trail.