beaver moon

POTD: Beaver Moon 2021

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I got some really cool shots of the moon about eight hours before it was completely full (3:58am EST, November 19). Then, I got some shots of the partial Lunar Eclipse. That was so awesome considering that it was the longest partial eclipse since 1440. My stupidphone couldn’t do it justice (I need a real camera).

Previous Beaver Moon posts here & here. Spooky, spooky… ~Vic

Beaver Moon 2021 Image
Taken @ 8:25pm
11-18-2021

Picture of the Day

Beaver Moon 2019

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I did a Beaver Moon post last year with background information and alternate names. I won’t duplicate the information, here…just some new pictures.

100% illumination occurred, here, at 8:34am EST.

All pictures are my personal collection ©. Howl for me! ~Vic

Beaver Moon 2019 Image One
Rising over the Riverwalk.
11-11-2019
Beaver Moon 2019 Image Two
Across the Eno.
Beaver Moon 2019 Image Three
Rising over the town.
Beaver Moon 2019 Image Four
Looks like birds in flight.

Old Farmer’s Almanac

Beaver Moon 2018

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Beaver Moon Image One
Personal Collection 11-05-2017

Well, so much for capturing this evening’s Beaver Moon. I guess I should have tried last night. Tonight is way too foggy. Instead, I present to you my shots from last November.

Also known as the Frosty Moon, it can be referred to as a Mourning Moon if it happens to be the last full moon before the Winter Solstice, as is the case this year.

Beaver Moon Image Two
Personal Collection 11-05-2017

MoonGiant Beaver Moon Image Three
Image Credit: MoonGiant

From MoonGiant:

November’s Full Moon was one of the most important of the year for Northern American communities. Most commonly known as the Full Beaver Moon, this Full Moon marked a time when rivers would begin to freeze over, making it impossible to set out traps. Many Native American tribes, including the Cree, Arapaho and, Abenaki tribes, called November’s full moon the “Moon When Rivers Start to Freeze”.

With the changing of the seasons, November’s full moon marks the beginning of the end. This year, it is the very last full moon before the winter solstice, which makes it the Mourning Moon according to Pagan tradition. In many different cultures, November’s full moon is intimately connected with death and loss, on both a literal and symbolic level. The Celts, for instance, called it the Reed Moon, comparing the mournful music made by wind instruments to the ghoulish sounds of spirits being drawn into the underworld. And, not without good reason…the Full Mourning Moon marks a dangerous time of the year where people could easily slip into the underworld with a single misstep.

We may enjoy the luxury of winter coats and central heating, now but, freezing to death during the long, dark winters used to be a very real threat to early inhabitants of Northern America. In order to survive, making warm winter clothing out of beaver fur was crucial for American colonists and Native American tribes. This is why November’s full moon is also known as the Beaver Moon. During this month, beavers are very active, working hard on dam construction and this was a good time to start harvesting their fur. Missing the timing for this would mean death for these early Northern American communities. This name drives home the importance of November’s full moon as a signal for these Native American tribes to begin trapping beavers before it was too late, as well as to complete their preparations for the darkest depths of winter.

For the Pagans, on the other hand, the final stage of their winter preparations involved the very important process of “mourning”, which is why they call the last moon before the winter solstice the Mourning Moon. After a full year of accumulating possessions, both physically and otherwise, the Mourning Moon is the perfect time to let go of old, unnecessary things, while giving yourself permission to mourn their passing. Practicing Pagans may perform a moonlit ritual where they write down the things they want to rid themselves of and ask their Goddess for help in removing unwanted burdens.

Pagan traditions aside, anyone can benefit from taking the time to self-reflect and to let go. Take advantage of the Full Mourning Moon this November to look back on your year. Take stock of your desires, ambitions, mental and behavioral habits and, the people you spend your energy on. Clean your living and work spaces and, sort out the physical objects that are not contributing to your well-being. Take the time to fully mourn and let go of anything, or anyone, that does not bring you joy, so that you can begin to move forward, unfettered, towards a lighter and happier new year.

Beaver Moon Image Four
Personal Collection 11-05-2017

 

100% illumination occurred at 12:39am EST.

Howl for me… ~Vic