full moon

POTD: Strawberry Full Moon

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I’ve done previous Strawberry Moon posts, the first, of which, I did shortly after returning to blogging after a four year absence. I think I have covered all the data.

Full illumination occurred June 24 @ 2:39pm EDT. You can howl if you want to. Go ahead. ~Vic

Full Strawberry Moon 2021 Image
Strawberry Moon 2021

Picture of the Day

Buck Moon 2020

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Full Buck Moon Image One
Image Credit: Farmers’ Almanac 1818

This is my first Buck Moon post. I totally missed 2019 & 2018. There was also a penumbral lunar eclipse happening, as well. Full illumination occurred at 12:44am EDT. Howl for me! ~Vic

Buck Moon Image One
Skeleton Tree Hand
Waxing Gibbous
07-03-2020

The Full Moon in July is the Buck Moon, named after the new antlers that emerge from a buck’s forehead around this time of the year. It is also called Thunder Moon, Hay Moon and Wort Moon. For farmers, high summer [is] the time to cut and cure hay to put away for winter feed.

Buck Moon Image Two
Spooky trees.

One of the more common names for this month’s Full Moon is the Thunder Moon, a tribute from the Algonquin to a time of year when spectacular electrical storms rake the northern forests. The Chinese deserve credit for an equally ominous name. The moon coincides with the Hungry Ghost Festival, a time when the living honor the dead by leaving food and drink to the ancestors. Their name? The Moon of the Hungry Ghosts.

Buck Moon Image Three
From the parking deck.
07-14-2020

Wort Moon [indicates] that July is the time to gather herbs (worts) to dry and use as spices and remedies. Additional names are Halfway Summer Moon (Ojibwe/Chippewa), Blueberry Moon (Ojibwe), Raspberry Moon (Ojibwe), Flying Moon (Ojibwe), Thunderstorm Moon (Catawba), Corn in Tassel [Moon] (Eastern Band Cherokee), Honey Bee Moon (Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Wisconsin), String Bean Moon (Oneida) and Little Sister of the Summer Moon (Tunica-Biloxi Tribe of Louisiana).

Additional Reading & Sources:
Native American Moon Names (American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association)
Full Buck Moon (Farmers’ Almanac 1818)
Full Moon Names (Moon Connection)
Full Thunder Moon (Moon Giant)
Full Moon For July (The Old Farmer’s Almanac 1792)
July: Buck Moon (Time and Date)

Strawberry Moon 2020

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I did a complete write-up on the Strawberry Moon last year with two videos. No need to repeat. Full illumination occurred at 3:12pm EDT. Howl for me! ~Vic

Late add:
I forgot to mention that there was a penumbral eclipse (space.com link) of this Moon but, we weren’t in the path of sight. We will be in the path of sight for the early July eclipse and the late November eclipse.

Gibbous Moon Clouds Image One
Waxing Gibbous with a Sky Eagle
06-01-2020
Gibbous Moon Trees Image Two
Through the limbs.
06-03-2020
Gibbous Moon Trees Image Three
Happy Waxing Gibbous
Gibbous Moon Trees Image Four
Growing Gibbous
06-04-2020
Waning Gibbous At Night Image Five
Clouds moved in.
Little bit of rain.
Spooky
06-05-2020
Waning Gibbous Clouds Image Six
Lovely glow.

Worm Moon 2020

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Worm Moon Image
Image Credit: moongiant.com

Last year, the Full Worm Moon coincided with the Vernal Equinox. This year, the Worm Moon will be at full illumination at 1:47pm, today. I got some shots of it, earlier (actually, wee hours of the morning).

I did a complete write-up on the Worm Moon on my 2019 post with all of the interesting and varied Native American names. This year, our Worm Moon is a Supermoon, though that isn’t really a true and official ‘astronomical’ term. It’s more of an astrological description and, apparently, was coined by astrologer Richard Nolle. The technical term is perigee syzygy, with perigee referring to the closeness of the Moon to the Earth and syzygy referring to a straight-line astronomical configuration of three celestial bodies. Depending upon that configuration, there might be a solar eclipse or a lunar eclipse. Supermoons also bring higher tides. This Moon is the last full moon of Winter. Howl for me! ~Vic

Worm Moon Image One
Big & bright.
From my driveway.
Worm Moon Image Two
Peaking thru the trees.
Worm Moon Image Three
Reaching out to touch it.
Worm Moon Image Four
I see you.

Snow Moon 2020

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Snow Moon 2020 Image Two
From my front yard.

I did a Snow Moon post last year on February 18. I covered all the unique names and the history. I won’t repeat the information here.

100% illumination occurred at 02:33am EST. Howl for me!

All photos are my personal collection. © ~Vic

Snow Moon 2020 Image Three
It’s spooky looking between the branches.
Snow Moon 2020 Image Four
I see you.
Moon Giant Snow Moon Image One
Image Credit: moongiant.com

Flower Moon 2019

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Flower Moon Image One
From my front porch.

From Moon Giant:

May is most notable for being the turning point in the year where temperatures rise and a vast variety of flowers come into full bloom, letting the world break out into a riot of color. As such, May’s full moon has come to be known as the Full Flower Moon. The Anishnaabe tribe also called it the Blossom Moon. In Northern America, you can expect to see flowers such as bluebells, sundrops, violets and so on, as well as lush greenery to go with the blossoms. The Apache and Lakota peoples named May’s full moon the Green Leaves Moon, while the Mohawk tribe called it the Big Leaf Moon. The Arapaho referred to this Full Moon as “when the ponies shed their shaggy hair”. But, there is one specific plant that’s very important during the May season and it is, in fact, not a flower.

Flower Moon Moon Giant Image Two
Image Credit: Moon Giant

This plant is corn, an important staple food for Northern American peoples. According to the Algonquin tribes, May’s full moon is the Corn Planting Moon. For Native American tribes, this is the perfect time for them to start preparing the fields for farming and sowing the seeds saved up from last year. Appropriately, the Abenaki culture refers to May’s full moon as the Field Maker Moon, while the Haida tribe calls it the Food Gathering Moon. Apart from corn, other foods such as beans, squash and potatoes are planted during this time. The Cherokee tribe called May’s full moon the Anisguti Moon or the Planting Moon and would, traditionally, perform a Corn Dance during this period to encourage a fruitful corn harvest.

Due to the rising temperatures, the Full Flower Moon is also a time of heightened fertility. This is a good time for women to bear children in a warm, safe environment that would increase the chance of their survival. That’s why May’s full moon is also named Mother’s Moon or Milk Moon which could refer to breastfeeding or to the milking of cows. The latter interpretation is based off the Old English name Rimilcemona, or the Month of Three Milkings referring to how this was a period where cows could be milked up to three times daily.

Flower Moon Image Three
Is there such a thing as Moon devils?

In other parts of the world, the Full Flower Moon is better known as Vesak or Buddha Day, the most significant celebration for Buddhists all around the world. On the first full moon of May, Buddhists commemorate the birth, enlightenment and passing of the Buddha. Devout practioners are encouraged to renew their intention to adhere to sacred Buddhist principles as well as refrain from all forms of killing and violence, including eating meat. Celebrations include giving charity to the poor, disabled and otherwise marginalized groups in society. Depending on your location, you may witness the spectacular practice of releasing thousands of caged birds into the air as a symbolic gesture of liberation, though this tradition is illegal in countries such as Singapore because it may cause harm to local ecosystems.

Flower Moon Image Five
Image Credit: almanac.com

Pagans, on the other hand, associate the Full Flower Moon with the element of fire and, thus, often celebrate it by lighting bonfires and engaging in other magical fire rituals to bring prosperity. Powerful colors for the Full Flower Moon include fiery colors like red, yellow and orange. This is a good time to tend your garden and let the seeds you’ve planted blossom, both literally and metaphorically. Cultivate your passions and desires, encourage them to burst forth into bloom and you will be rewarded with abundance in various forms in your life.


 

This Flower Moon is also a Seasonal Blue Moon and 100% illumination occurred at 5:11pm EDT. Howl for me! ~Vic

Vernal Equinox & Worm Moon 2019

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Vernal Equinox Image One
Image Credit: psychics.com

Spwing has spwung! Well, maybe not. I understand that the Northeast US is getting hit by a ‘Nor’easter‘ at the moment. But, as I am typing this, the official arrival time of the Vernal (Spring) Equinox was 5:58pm EDT here in the Northern Hemisphere/Southeastern US. I posted the definition of equinox back in September 2018 but, the term ‘Vernal’ translates tonew‘ or ‘fresh‘. A fresh start is on the way.

From Time And Date:

Earth’s axis is tilted at an angle of about 23.4° in relation to the ecliptic plane, the imaginary plane created by the Earth’s path around the Sun. On any other day of the year, either the Southern Hemisphere or the Northern Hemisphere tilts a little towards the Sun. But, on the two equinoxes, the tilt of the Earth’s axis is perpendicular to the Sun’s rays, like the illustration (below) shows. The March equinox is often used by astronomers to measure a tropical year, the mean time it takes for the Earth to complete a single orbit around the Sun. Also known as a solar year, a tropical year is approximately 365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes and 45 seconds long.

Easter is celebrated on the Sunday following the first full moon on or after March 21. Since the full moon occurs on March 21 at 01:42 UTC, that, apparently, throws Easter’s celebrations to the Sunday following the next full moon, which is April 19.

There are other celebrations. From Time And Date:

The Iranian New Year (Nowruz, No-Ruz, No-Rooz or No Ruz) occurs during the time of the March Equinox, in accordance with the Persian astronomical calendar. It has been celebrated for over 3000 years and is rooted in the traditions of Zoroastrianism. No-Ruz celebrations last for about 12 days. Preparations start well in advance and include buying new clothes for family members and thoroughly cleaning homes. Wheat or lentil representing new growth is grown in a flat dish a few days before the New Year and is called Sabzeh (green shoots).

Higan (Higan-e or Ohigan), is a week of Buddhist services in Japan during the March and September Equinox. Both equinoxes have been national holidays since the Meiji period (1868-1912). “Higan” means the “other shore” (Sanzu River) and refers to dead spirits who reach Nirvana after crossing the river of existence. It celebrates the spiritual move from the world of suffering to the world of enlightenment.

Vernal Equinox Image Two
Image Credit: timeanddate.com

We will also be graced with a full moon, tonight. It was 100% full illumination at 9:42pm EDT. Busy day! Unfortunately, we have had a rainy day, today, so no shots of it full. The sky has been nothing but a boring shade of grey. I did get a few shots of it earlier in the week, though. They weren’t too bad.

Moon Image Three
All Photos Are My Personal Collection Unless Otherwise Stated
Peeking thru the limbs.
Saint Patrick’s Day
Moon Image Four
Brilliant blue sky.
Looks like a golf ball.
Saint Patrick’s Day
Moon Image Five
Over the Riverwalk.
Saint Patrick’s Day
Moon Image Six
Hanging out over the park bench.
Saint Patrick’s Day
Moon Image Seven
Rising in town at 7:39pm, yesterday.
Best I could do.


From Moon Giant:

March’s full moon is commonly called the Full Worm Moon. This is because of the earthworms that wriggle out of the ground as the earth begins to thaw in March. Here’s a little known fact about March’s full moon…it was called the Worm Moon only by Southern Native American tribes. In fact, there’s no way the Northern tribes would have ever called it the Worm Moon and the reason why is fascinating.

Essentially, earthworms did not exist in Northern America. It would be literally impossible for Northern tribes to see worms popping up in March. All the earthworms you see in Northern America today are invasive species brought in by colonists. These earthworms were brought over either out of a misguided intent to help fertilize the soil or, as an accident along with transported plants or the soil used for ballast in ships. Little did the colonists know that, during the last Ice Age, glaciers had spread so far across Canada and the northern parts of the United States that, all earthworms had been completely wiped out.

When the deep ice melted 12,000 years ago, the native forests in those areas grew back and adapted to the loss of earthworms. The growth of these forests became dependent on a layer of duff, which is a compost layer comprised of decomposing leaves and other rotting organic matter. If you ever visit one of these native forests, you will be asked to clean your shoes and make sure it’s free of earthworm eggs. That’s because, while it’s normally harmless everywhere else, earthworms will aggressively destroy the native forest’s duff layer by eating right through it.

This is why in Northern American tribes, such as the Shawnee tribe, the Worm Moon is called the Sap Moon, instead, as a reminder for the tribes that they can begin tapping maple syrup. In general, March’s full moon is known as a herald for the beginning of spring and new agricultural cycles. The Anglo-Saxons even used the Worm Moon as a way to predict the state of their crops. They called it the Storm Moon if it was stormy, which was a sign that their crops would fail. But, if it was dry, they called it the Rugged Moon, an indication of a bounteous harvest.

One of its other names is the Chaste Moon, symbolizing the purity of early spring. The Pueblo tribe named it the Moon When the Leaves Break Forth, while in Shoshone culture, it was known as the Warming Moon. Sometimes, it is called the Crow Moon, after the crows and other birds that appear as winter draws to a close. Other times, it’s called the Crust Moon, because of the snow that becomes crusty when it thaws in the sun and freezes in the moonlight.

In India, March’s full moon is also seen as a symbol of the arrival of spring and coincides with the festival of Holi. This is a riotous party where Indian communities all around the world engage in a huge water fight. Everyone goes out into the streets and sprays each other with colored water and powders, singing and dancing with strangers and, loved ones, alike. Playing and feasting together is a chance for you to repair relationships that have gone bad, reaffirming your existing social bonds as you move forward together into the new year.

Other moon names:
Moon When Eyes Are Sore From Bright Snow from the Dakota Sioux
Lenten Moon from the Christian settlers
Sugar Moon
Last Full Moon of Winter

It is also a Supermoon, our last for 2019.

Howl for me… ~Vic

Winter Solstice 2018

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Winter Solstice Image
Photo Credit: harmoniousheartwellness.com

I was hoping to capture some images of the Moon, tonight but, we are so overcast from the rain storms, it’s just not going to happen. I will try tomorrow night.

Winter is officially here, as if all the snow we’ve had wasn’t a clue. The solstice arrived at 5:23pm EST and tomorrow’s Full Moon will be at 100% full illumination at 12:48pm EST. From The Almanac:

The word solstice comes from Latin sol “sun” and sistere “to stand still.” In the Northern Hemisphere, as summer advances to winter, the points on the horizon where the Sun rises and sets advance southward each day. The high point in the Sun’s daily path across the sky, which occurs at local noon, also moves southward each day.

At the winter solstice, the Sun’s path has reached its southernmost position. The next day, the path will advance northward. However, a few days before and after the winter solstice, the change is so slight that the Sun’s path seems to stay the same, or stand still. The Sun is directly overhead at “high-noon” on Winter Solstice at the latitude called the Tropic of Capricorn.

The solstice is the beginning of astronomical winter. (An almanac is defined as a “calendar of the heavens,” so we use the astronomical definition.) Astronomical seasons are based on the position of the Earth in relation to the Sun. However, meteorological seasons are based on the annual temperature cycle. For the ancient Celts, the calendar was based around the solstices and equinoxes, marking the Quarter Days, with the mid-points called Cross-Quarter Days.

Winter Fairy Image
Photo Credit: bwallpapers.com

This is the longest night of the year. It is a time for rest and reflection. Just like Spring cleaning time, the beginning of Winter can herald a cleaning of its own. Cold temperatures and bad weather can mean more time indoors. It can be a time for sifting through the past or contemplating the future. Many may find that re-evaluating relationships and possessions is easier during this slower time. I will be lighting a candle and smudging. Wishing everyone health and happiness. ~Vic

Harvest Moon 2018

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Well. I was intending to take pictures of the Moon and post them. Alas, that just isn’t happening. We have cloud cover so thick, I can’t even see a faint glow. Bummer.

Traditionally referred to as the Harvest Moon due to the fact that it is the full moon closest to the Autumnal Equinox, this Moon is also known as the Corn Moon and the Fruit Moon. This Moon was important to early farmers because they had more bright moon nights to gather crops. Corn, pumpkins, squash, beans and wild rice, the primary Native American staples, are now ready for gathering.

100% full illumination occurred just a bit, ago, at 10:52pm EDT.

The three pix, below, are from the full moon on September 6, 2017.

Personal Collection 09-06-2017
Personal Collection 09-06-2017
Personal Collection 09-06-2017

Howl for me…
~Victoria ❤

Strawberry Moon 2018

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Also known as Rose Moon or Flower Moon.

Moon Photo One
From My Personal Collection
Moon Photo Two
From My Personal Collection
Moon Photo Three
From My Personal Collection
Moon Photo Four
From My Personal Collection

100% full illumination occurred on June 28 at 12:53am EDT.

Howl for me.

~Victoria