front porch

Harvest Moon 2019

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I did a Harvest Moon post last year and, once again, I can’t get any pix of tonight’s moon. We have an incredible low ceiling and I haven’t seen the sun all day. On a positive note, a low ceiling makes sound travel farther and I can hear the local high school football game from three miles away. The last time there was a full moon on Friday the 13th, it was January of 2006 and it wasn’t here. Technically, my area won’t be full illumination until 12:33am EDT but, the rest of the country, westward…Jason might turn into a werewolf.

I DO have some shots from September 15, 2016, tho, taken with my, then, Samsung S5.

From Moon Giant:

September’s Full Moon was called the Full Corn Moon or Harvest Moon by the early North American Farmers. The term “Harvest Moon” refers to the Full Moon that occurs closest to the Autumnal Equinox. The Full Moon closest to this Equinox rises about 20 minutes later each night as apposed to the rest of the year when the moon rises around 50 minutes later each night. In the northern hemisphere, the Full Harvest Moon rises very soon after sunset, providing plenty of bright light for farmers harvesting their summer crops. September’s full moon is so well-known for its luminosity and brilliance that certain Native American tribes even named it the Big Moon. The Full Harvest Moon holds major cultural significance in many different communities, who spend this full moon not just celebrating the fall harvest but, also, the moon itself.

Harvest Moon 2016 Image One

The most widely known tradition associated with the Full Harvest Moon is the Mid-Autumn Festival, celebrated by Chinese communities all around the world. It is also known as the Mooncake Festival. On the full moon night of the eighth lunar month, people gather with friends and family to admire the brilliant full moon while eating mooncakes and drinking tea. Mooncakes are a rich pastry traditionally filled with sweet bean paste, or lotus seed paste, and sometimes, even include salted egg yolks. The sweet osmanthus flower also blooms during this time and, is often used in teas and the reunion wine drunk when visiting with family. It is a common tradition to celebrate by carrying brightly colored lanterns. [You] can often enjoy the beautiful sight of lanterns hanging in front of buildings or in parks, or sky lanterns floating towards the full moon.

Harvest Moon 2016 Image Two

The Japanese celebrate this full moon with the Tsukimi tradition (which literally means moon-viewing in Japanese), where people prepare offerings to the moon and eat round tsukimi dango, or rice dumplings. In Korea, this full moon is celebrated as Chuseok, which is one of Korea’s most major holidays, similar to Thanksgiving. People travel back to their hometowns for reunions with their family and tend to their ancestors’ graves. Traditional activities include exchanging gifts, playing folk games, drinking rice wine, and eating songpyeon, which is a rice cake shaped like a half-moon.

[The] Full Harvest Moon is called the Nut Moon by the Cherokee tribes, who gather all sorts of nuts to make nut bread, which is eaten during harvest festivals such as the Ripe Corn Festival. During this moon, Native American tribes pay respects to Mother Earth for her generosity in providing food for her children, including corn and other staple foods. Chinese communities, on the other hand, spend the Mid-Autumn Festival worshipping the Moon Goddess, Chang’e.

Just as I was creating this post, our clouds cleared. I got a couple of different shots as I was experimenting with my phone’s camera settings.

Harvest Moon 2019 Image Three
From the front porch…
Harvest Moon 2019 Image Four
Little bit darker.

Howl for me! ~Vic


 

Foto Friday: Critter Collections 5.0

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All Things Critter
All photos are my personal collection. ~Vic
Part I/Part II/Part III/Part IV

McKinley Spider Image One
A McKinley by the lamp post at the First Baptist Church.
The web was enormous.
09-02-2017
Orb Weaver Image Two
An Orb Weaver off the corner of the front porch.
09-22-2017
Preying Mantis Image Three
I guess she was enjoying the flowers.
10-02-2017
Preying Mantis Image Four
She posed for me.
What a ham.
Slug Image Five
Slug on the front porch.
10-18-2017
Lady Beetle Image Six
It took me a while to find this one.
Google “black bug, yellow dots” and you will get tons of pix.
This is an Asian lady beetle larva.
10-28-2017
Slug Image Seven
Larger slug on the side of the house.
06-16-2018
Moth Image Eight
Moth on the kitchen window.
04-03-2019

Shutterbug Saturday: Critter Collections 2.0

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This is a continuation of nature’s creatures.
Part I was posted on April 6.
All photos are my personal collection. ~Vic

Grasshopper Image One
Just hanging out on the front porch.
10-08-2014
Grasshopper Image Two
Long legs and big feet.
10-08-2014
Butterfly Image Three
Walking around town.
Poor focus but, still beautiful.
07-31-2016
Spider Image Four
This was a huge web with an equally huge spider.
Also a poor focus. I was keeping some distance.
My phone didn’t want to coöperate.
The tan blur in the center is said spider.
09-06-2016
Spider Image Five
Another huge spider, hanging from the eave over the front porch.
A light rain highlighted the web.
09-30-2016
Mole Image Eight
I believe this cute, deceased, furry thing is a mole but, I’m not totally sure.
The neighbor’s cat brought me a present.
10-21-2016
Preying Mantis Image Six
I nearly missed seeing this after finding the mole.
She is almost the same color as the table.
Preying Mantis Image Seven
This is the first Preying Mantis I’ve seen that was brown.
Most of the ones I have encountered, before, were green.

More to come…

Shutterbug Sunday: Snow Bombs 2018

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Rocking Chair Image One
Personal Collection 12-09-2018

Have mercy…two big snowstorms in one year. This is reminding me of my childhood. I remember lots of snow and lots of snowmen in the 70s. I also remember folks being more mobile back then, too. Anytime there was a snow forecast, my dad was putting chains on the back tires of the ’72 Charger. Everybody got chains and off they went. Even in the early 80s, a manual, front-wheel-drive compact would pretty much get you anywhere. My 1977 Honda Civic and my 1983 Toyota Tercel took me where I wanted to go. People just don’t do that anymore. Cars these days are definitely more fragile and lighter than the metal monsters of yesteryear.

I remember zipping around in the snow in the middle 80s (college days) in my Civic. One particular trip, I was headed to a friend’s place for snacks, movies and snowballs. I was approaching an intersection that included a railroad crossing (with roads and individual intersections on either side) and a steep, short hill on the other side of it. The light was red as I cleared the tracks but, my Civic became excited about the hill-induced inertia and my attempt to slow down (tapping said brakes lightly) only brought my ass end around. Just as the light turned green, I slid sideways, all the way thru the intersection. Once my Civic was done having fun (yes, I’m blaming it on the car), I came to a stop, hitting nothing…and, nothing hitting me…and, then, proceeded on my way. If it were today, I’d either be dead or, viral on social media.

Today

Side Door Image Two
Hmmm…little difficult opening the side door
Covered Mum Image Three
There really is a Mum under there
Cedar Tree Image Four
Heavy Cedar limbs
Adirondack Chairs Image Five
My Adirondacks are nearly covered.

January 17

Mighty Oak Image Six
Personal Collection 01-17-2018
Majestic, mighty Oak across the street
Dogwood Image Seven
Cold little Dogwood
Mr. Maple Image Eight
Mr. Maple in the front yard
Lonely Tree Image Nine
Lonely tree in the empty lot up the street
Ollie Image Ten
Seriously, Mommy? What IS this stuff?

Shutterbug Saturday: October Beauty

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All photos are my personal collection. ~Vic


Mum Image One
Front porch Mums.
10-13-2018


Coleus Image Two
A Coleus farm amid the weeds.
10-13-2018


Happy Bee Image Three
The happy bee.
10-13-2018


Fuchsia & Red Mums Image Four
Fuchsia & red Mums.
Side patio.
10-13-2018


October Berries Image Five
October berries.
10-13-2018


October Rose Image Six
October Rose.
10-13-2018


October Sun Image Seven
My friend Ray in the October sun.
10-13-2018


Orange/Yellow Mum Image Eight
Beautiful orange & yellow Mum in my concrete planter.
10-13-2018


Lavendar Flowers Image Nine
Lavender flowers in the Turnip Patch Park.
I wish I knew what they were.
10-06-2018


October Sunset Image Ten
October sunset.
10-13-2018