flowers

Scoop Saturday: The Hairy Eagle

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The Hairy Eagle Image One
Photo Credit: Sandra Roe
Photos @ 1020
The Onondaga Historical Association
Amusing Planet

In a small, dimly lit back room of the Onondaga Historical Association in Syracuse, New York, is a unique and priceless treasure…a civil-war era decorative eagle. [It is] made entirely out of hair, contributed by leading politicians, and their wives, most notably…President Abraham Lincoln and First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln. The artifact came about when the US Sanitary Commission, a volunteer agency working for the health of Union soldiers during the war, needed money for its efforts. [They] reached out to President Lincoln soliciting, a lock of hair as large as he [could] spare. Lincoln communicated the request to other members of the parliament and a surprisingly large number of politicians, and their wives, responded positively. [They donated] their hair for the Brooklyn jewelers Spies & Champney to weave a national symbol out of it.

The Hairy Eagle Image Two
Photo Credit: The Onondaga Historical Association
Former Onondaga Historical Association Director Carolyn Wright
1959
Amusing Planet

The large showpiece, nicknamed the Hairy Eagle, featured an American eagle, perched on top of half a globe, spreading its wings and, surrounded with swirls and flowers. The eagle’s head was made from Lincoln’s hair, its back, from Vice President Hannibal Hamlin’s hair, its beak, from Secretary of the Treasury Salmon Chase’s hair and, its wings, from the various senators’ hair. The wives’ hair, meanwhile, was used to create the floral arrangement, surmounted by the eagle and globe. The eagle became an immediate attraction when it was debuted at Metropolitan Sanitary Fair, organized to raise funds for the benefit of Union soldiers. Running for three weeks in April 1864, the fair featured events, attractions, auctions, raffles and more. For the entry fee of $2, visitors could view spectacular floral arrangements in the Temple of Flora, watch dances performed by the Fair’s Native American Troupe, enjoy Dutch cuisine at the Knickerbocker Kitchen and even buy a piece of Plymouth Rock. Tens of thousands of people visited the Hairy Eagle during this time. Underneath it, a small visitor book was kept, in which guests were able to sign their name on the payment of one dollar. The goal was to raise $1,000.

The Hairy Eagle Image Three
Photo Credit: Sandy Roe
Photos @ 1020
Onondaga Historical Association
Amusing Planet

It’s not known whether the goal of $1000 and 1000 signatures was reached but, reports of the fair compiled three years later noted that the book was so popular that, 400 signatures and $400 were collected within the first three days of the Fair. The Hairy Eagle was meant to be presented to the Lincolns as a gift after the fair ended but, the wreath never made its way to the White House. Instead, it hung in the window of the Champney & Smitten shop in Brooklyn for many years before disappearing for decades. In the 1920s, F.T. Champney’s wife Ida donated the eagle to Onondaga Historical Association, where it has remained ever since.

Additional Reading:
Civil War Era Eagle Sculpture
(Smithsonian Magazine/Jason Emerson/September 23, 2021)

Syracuse

POTD: Tulips

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Pl@ntNet seems to think this is a Didier’s Tulip or Tulipa Gesneriana. There are so many tulip variations, it would be difficult to narrow down any particular one. There are lots of hybrids. They are all in the Liliaceae family. ~Vic

Didier's Tulip Image
04-10-2019

Picture of the Day

Snapshots Sunday: Solstice Shots

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I dropped the ball and missed posting about our Summer Solstice. I did catch some pictures, though and a Snapshots Sunday is a perfect reason to post them. I posted about the Solstice in 2018, shortly after I had started blogging, again, after a four year absence. I did an Almanac write-up on the Solstice in 2019. This year’s Solstice occurred at 5:44pm EDT, yesterday. ~Vic

Daisy Group Image One
Daisy Family
Sea Turtle Cloud Image Two
It looks like a Sea Turtle, swimming towards me…sort of…
Cone Flower Image Three
Cone flowers in the Pollinator Garden
Feather Cloud Image Four
Big Feather
New Growth Image Five
New Growth
Bird Flight Image Six
In Flight
Stonehenge Image Seven
Photo Credit: Farmers’ Almanac 1818

Some Folklore:
♦ In ancient Egypt, the summer solstice coincided with the rising of the Nile River. As it was crucial to predict this annual flooding, the Egyptian New Year began at this important solstice.
♦ In centuries past, the Irish would cut hazel branches on solstice eve to be used in searching for gold, water and precious jewels.
♦ Many European cultures hold what are known as Midsummer celebrations at the solstice, which include gatherings at Stonehenge and the lighting of bonfires on hilltops.

FFTD: Lots of Daisies

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I had intended to do a Shutterbug Saturday post but, I’ve spent the entire day battling my laptop. I curse Microsoft.

Instead, here are some late season, happy daisies. ~Vic

Daisies Image
10-28-2018

Flower for the Day

FFTD: Azaleas

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Azaleas are usually Springtime visitors. Some of them, well, they are the late bloomers. This is a small bush on the First Baptist church property. ~Vic

Azaleas Image
09-23-2018

Flower for the Day

FFTD: Royal Blue

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I will have to figure this one out, later. ~Vic

Update:
After much digging, I found this to be a Salvia Guaranitica or Hummingbird Sage.

Royal Blue Flower Image
10-06-2018

Flower for the Day

FFTD: Bright Yellow

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I haven’t a clue what kind of flower this is but, I will dig around and see what I can find.

Update:
This looks very much like a Forsythia. ~Vic

Yellow Flower Bush
Around town.
Neighbor’s bush.
03-31-2019

Flower for the Day

Foto Friday: Critter Collections 5.0

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All Things Critter
All photos are my personal collection. ~Vic
Part I/Part II/Part III/Part IV

McKinley Spider Image One
A McKinley by the lamp post at the First Baptist Church.
The web was enormous.
09-02-2017
Orb Weaver Image Two
An Orb Weaver off the corner of the front porch.
09-22-2017
Preying Mantis Image Three
I guess she was enjoying the flowers.
10-02-2017
Preying Mantis Image Four
She posed for me.
What a ham.
Slug Image Five
Slug on the front porch.
10-18-2017
Lady Beetle Image Six
It took me a while to find this one.
Google “black bug, yellow dots” and you will get tons of pix.
This is an Asian lady beetle larva.
10-28-2017
Slug Image Seven
Larger slug on the side of the house.
06-16-2018
Moth Image Eight
Moth on the kitchen window.
04-03-2019

FFTD: Pale Lovelies

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I was intending to do a Movie Monday but, I’m struggling with stuff older than 100 years. I will tend to that later. ~Vic

Update:
With help from a fellow blogger, the below photo is a Hellebore. Thank you!

Pale Lovelies Image
I haven’t a clue what these are but, they are so sweet (I know what these are, now!).
03-31-2019

Flower for the Day

Shutterbug Saturday: October Beauty

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All photos are my personal collection ©. ~Vic


Mum Image One
Front porch Mums.
10-13-2018


Coleus Image Two
A Coleus farm amid the weeds.
10-13-2018


Happy Bee Image Three
The happy bee.
10-13-2018


Fuchsia & Red Mums Image Four
Fuchsia & red Mums.
Side patio.
10-13-2018


October Berries Image Five
October berries.
10-13-2018


October Rose Image Six
October Rose
10-13-2018



October Sun Image Seven
My friend Ray in the October sun.
10-13-2018


Orange/Yellow Mum Image Eight
Beautiful orange & yellow Mum in my concrete planter.
10-13-2018


Lavendar Flowers Image Nine
Lavender flowers in the Turnip Patch Park.
I wish I knew what they were.
10-06-2018


October Sunset Image Ten
October sunset.
10-13-2018