chrysanthemums

Foto Friday: Halloween Local 3.0

Posted on Updated on

I was planning to do a Flick Friday for 1954. No such luck. In fact, sticking with Friday and sticking with 1954, there are no releases until well into December. *sigh* So, you gets pix! All photos are my personal collection. ~Vic

Part I/Part II/Old Halloween Stuff

Halloween Image One
Minimalist decorations for a home originally built in 1860.
Taken: 10-27-2018
Halloween Image Two
Rest in pieces. Love the black rose.
Taken: 10-28-2018
Halloween Image Three
Opposite side. Twins?
Halloween Image Four
I think this is supposed to be a ghost/skeleton mix. Not totally sure…
Halloween Image Five
Just hanging out on the porch with the dog…and a gargoyle.
Halloween Image Six
Hanging around.
Lovely home built in 1936.
Halloween Image Seven
That is one big spider.
Can you see the barbie doll and the two baby spiders?
Halloween Image Eight
Let me out!
Taken: 10-30-2018
Halloween Image Nine
Skeletons can garden, too.
Halloween Image Ten
Resting under the tree.

FFTD: Mums

Posted on Updated on

This is a Chrysanthemum that I planted back in 2014. It must have been very happy where I put it because it was huge two years later. It finally gave up the next year. ~Vic

Chrysanthemum Image
This is just one plant.
10-14-2016

Flower for the Day

Hunter’s Moon 2018

Posted on Updated on

Hunter Moon Image One
Personal Collection
Hunter Moon Image Two
Personal Collection
Hunter Moon Image Three
Personal Collection
Hunter Moon Image Four
Personal Collection
Hunter Moon Image Five
Personal Collection

The leaves are falling. The deer have grown fat for the winter. Hunters can move more easily over cleared fields, spotting the smaller animals. Also known as the Blood Moon or Sanguine Moon, Native Americans named the moon for the hunt and the storing of meat for the winter. Traditionally, it was a feasting day in Western Europe and among many tribes. From Moon Giant:

Contrary to popular belief, the Hunter’s Moon isn’t actually bigger or brighter than usual. It simply rises earlier, soon after sunset, which would give hunters plenty of bright moonlight to hunt by during the early evenings. To Neo-Pagans, however, the Hunter’s Moon is known by a far more morbid name – the Blood Moon.

Humans through the ages have always found autumn’s full moons to be creepy and not without good reason. There’s a reason why English folks in the Middle Ages called October’s full moon the Blood Moon and it’s the exact same reason why even Halloween imagery today often features a large, low-hanging moon with an eerie reddish glow. The Hunter’s Moon rises early in the evening, which means that you are more likely to see it near the horizon. When you observe the moon while it’s near the horizon, it gives off the illusion of being bigger while it’s in fact the same size. In addition, observing the moon at the horizon makes it look redder. This is because you’re seeing it through a thicker atmosphere, which scatters more blue light and lets more red light pass through to reach your eyes.

Scientific explanations aside, the Hunter’s Moon or Blood Moon still holds an undeniable aura of mystique and power. As October’s full moon occurs right before Samhain, the Gaelic mid-autumn festival that has evolved into Halloween today, Neo-Pagans consider the month of the Blood Moon to be a special time denoting the change of seasons and, a prime opportunity to contact dead loved ones, given the thinning of the veil between the physical world and the spiritual world. Precious stones such as amethyst are used to ward off evil and, sacred flowers like chrysanthemum are used when working with spirits, such as in rituals to commune with long-dead ancestors.

Despite the Blood Moon’s spooky associations, it rarely actually happens on Samhain or Halloween night itself. The next time you’ll get to see the full moon on Halloween is 2020, and if you miss that, you’ll have to wait 15 years to see it in 2035. Sometimes, October’s full moon even happens early enough in the month that it becomes the Harvest Moon, which is defined as the full moon that’s closest to the fall equinox. In Chinese culture, the Harvest Moon is celebrated during the Mid-Autumn Festival, where people gather to celebrate by eating mooncakes. There is also a harvest festival in India that celebrates October’s full moon called Sharad Purnima. Devotees fast all day before offering delicacies to the Moon God under the moonlight.

In contrast to the day-long fast of India’s moonlight festival, the Hunter’s Moon was a very important feast day in Europe as well as for many Native American tribes. Appropriately, the Ponca tribe’s name for the Hunter’s Moon is “the moon when they store food in caches”. Taking advantage of the fact that the fields have been reaped, hunters would capture foxes and other small animals who come out to graze on the fallen grains as well as hunt down deer in the moonlight. They would butcher their prey and preserve their meat. Blood Moon is an excellent name for this month’s full moon, given that it was a final, bloody harvesting of meat before the winter months.

Sadly, the tradition of feasting during the Hunter’s Moon was lost around the year 1700, but its spirit still lives on in historical reenactments like the Feast of the Hunter’s Moon, or even the feast of candy enjoyed by trick-or-treaters everywhere on Halloween.

This Hunter’s Moon reached 100% illumination at 12:45pm EDT.

Howl for me…
~Victoria

Shutterbug Saturday: October Beauty

Posted on Updated on

All photos are my personal collection. ~Vic


Mum Image One
Front porch Mums.
10-13-2018


Coleus Image Two
A Coleus farm amid the weeds.
10-13-2018


Happy Bee Image Three
The happy bee.
10-13-2018


Fuchsia & Red Mums Image Four
Fuchsia & red Mums.
Side patio.
10-13-2018


October Berries Image Five
October berries.
10-13-2018


October Rose Image Six
October Rose.
10-13-2018


October Sun Image Seven
My friend Ray in the October sun.
10-13-2018


Orange/Yellow Mum Image Eight
Beautiful orange & yellow Mum in my concrete planter.
10-13-2018


Lavendar Flowers Image Nine
Lavender flowers in the Turnip Patch Park.
I wish I knew what they were.
10-06-2018


October Sunset Image Ten
October sunset.
10-13-2018

Shutterbug Saturday: Loving Fall

Posted on Updated on

The leaves, the leaves are falling…

A pathway in our local Riverwalk.

Image One
Personal Collection 09-23-2018

Local pink Mums.

Personal Collection 10-06-2018

One of many resting benches along the Riverwalk.

Personal Collection 09-23-2018

Lovely lavender Mums.

Personal Collection 10-06-2018

One of several Riverwalk bridges.

Personal Collection 09-23-2018

I spent my day running errands, enjoying walking the Riverwalk and getting my beloved Mum collection. When I walked out of the house at Noon, the temperature was 72°. I love this time of year. I just wish the mosquitoes would go away, already. ~Victoria