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Tune Tuesday: Deniece Williams 1984

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Footloose Image One
Photo Credit: rollingstone.com

Thirty-five years ago, today, the #1 song on the Billboard Hot 100 and Hot R & B charts (plus Cash Box) was Let’s Hear For The Boy by Deniece Williams from the soundtrack of the movie Footloose. This was Williams second number one hit on the Billboard 100.

Composed by Tom Snow and Dean Pitchford, country singer Jana Kramer performed the song for the 2011 Footloose remake.

Deniece Williams Image Two
Image Credit: classic45s.com

From Songfacts [no citations]:

This was the second single from the Footloose soundtrack, following the “title track,” which was recorded by Kenny Loggins. In the film, the song was used in a scene where Kevin Bacon tries to teach Christopher Penn how to dance and Penn is having a hard time.

Once the song was written, Pitchford asked Deniece Williams and her producer George Duke to record the song. Kenny Loggins was onboard for the title track, which gave the project credibility and, Williams loved the song and the story idea for the film. She grew up in a small Indiana town with a religious environment similar to the one described in Footloose. When she saw the film, she thought the scene where they used her song was incredible. “If I had come to the film without the music in and they asked me what segment I wanted my song to be in, I would have chosen that segment.” said Williams.

Best Original Song Academy Award Nomination
Best Pop Vocal Performance (Single) Grammy Nomination
Best R & B Vocal Performance (Album) Grammy Nomination

Official Music Video

 

Footloose Movie Clip

Lyrics
[Verse 1]
My baby, he don’t talk sweet
He ain’t got much to say
But he loves me, loves me, loves me
I know that he loves me anyway
And maybe he don’t dress fine
But I don’t really mind
‘Cause every time he pulls me near
I just wanna cheer

[Chorus]
Let’s hear it for the boy
Let’s give the boy a hand
Let’s hear it for my baby
You know you gotta understand
Maybe he’s no Romeo
But he’s my loving one-man show
Whooa, whooa, whooa-oh
Let’s hear it for the boy

[Verse 2]
My baby may not be rich
He’s watching every dime
But he loves me, loves me, loves me
We always have a real good time
And maybe he sings off-key
But that’s all right by me, yeah
‘Cause what he does, he does so well
Makes me wanna yell

[Chorus]
Let’s hear it for the boy
Let’s give the boy a hand
Let’s hear it for my baby
You know you gotta understand
Maybe he’s no Romeo
But he’s my loving one-man show
Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa
Let’s hear it for the boy

[Pre-Chorus]
‘Cause every time he pulls me near
I just wanna cheer

[Chorus]
Let’s hear it for the boy
Let’s give the boy a hand
Let’s hear it for my baby
You know you gotta understand
Maybe he’s no Romeo
But he’s my loving one-man show
Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa
Let’s hear it for the boy

[Outro]
Let’s hear it for the boy
Let’s hear it for my man
Let’s hear it for my man
Let’s hear it for my man
Let’s hear it for the boy
Let’s hear it for my man
Let’s hear it for the boy
Let’s hear it for my man
Let’s hear it for my man
Let’s hear it for the boy
Let’s hear it for my man
Let’s hear it for the boy
Let’s hear it for my man
Let’s hear it for my man
Let’s hear it for the boy
Let’s hear it for my man
Let’s hear it for my man

Movie Monday: The Way We Were 1973

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The Way We Were Image One
Photo Credit: dailymail.co.uk

Ok, folks. I am shifting things a bit. What used to be Flick Friday is now Movie Monday! *applause*applause* All blogs change and evolve…and, we’re off…

Forty-five years ago, today, the #1 movie at the box office was The Way We Were, a film described as a romantic drama. It’s drama alright. Directed by Sydney Pollack, it is a period piece based upon a novel by Arthur Laurents. He wrote about his college days at Cornell University and his experience with HCUA, which ultimately led to Hollywood Blacklisting. I’m not going to comment any further on the details as it is a little too close to the political nonsense of today.

That being said, Marvin Hamlisch won two Oscars for Best Original Score and Best Original Song.