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POTD: Whale & Calf

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This is what I see. What do you see? ~Vic

Whale Cloud Image
07-12-2019

Shutterbug Saturday: Critter Collections 7.0

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All Things Critter
All photos are my personal collection. ~Vic
Part I/Part II/Part III/Part IV/Part V/Part VI

Grasshopper Image One
Big grasshopper.
Taken with my old Samsung Alias II.
Nature Preserve
Round Rock, TX
10-25-2008
Lizard Image Two
Another shot of the blue tail.
05-06-2019
Tiny Bee Image Three
Tiny bee in my side yard.
05-13-2019
Ladybug Image Four
On the Riverwalk, headed to Gold Park.
Love the Ladybugs.
05-13-2019
Dragonfly Image Five
Dragonfly in the Butterfly Garden.
He looks like a Skivvy Waver.
05-17-2019
Wolf Spider Image Six
Wolf spider running on the Riverwalk.
05-19-2019
Bumblebees Image Seven
Hungry Bumbles
05-31-2019
Preying Mantis Image Eight
Young Preying Mantis on a Black-Eyed Susan.
Riverwalk
05-31-2019

POTD: Patience

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On the way to the restaurant I mentioned in my post, yesterday, there was a pit stop for gas. Not only was this a cool looking older truck, the adorable pooch waiting patiently for his owner was so sweet.

Dog In Truck Image
Sweet baby.
02-19-2015

Shutterbug Saturday: Feathers 4.0

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Feather Image One
Photo Credit: George Becker on Pexels

In my last post on March 2, I was talking about sitting under my Hackberry tree and getting pelted with debris from a little woodpecker above me. I tried to get some shots of him but, they weren’t clear enough. My S7 just doesn’t do well with distance. That’s OK. I have other stuff.

Part I
Part II
Part III

Cardinal Image Two
From the Den window.
02-19-2019
Cardinal Image Three
And, he looked at the camera.
Geese Image Four
Geese coming up from the river.
04-16-2019
Geese Image Five
And, headed to a neighbor’s backyard.
Geese Image Six
They are such a cute pair.
Boot Birdhouse Image Seven
I haven’t seen any activity…yet. 05-06-2019

FFTD: Tree of Lavender

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This is a tree on the church grounds. It’s huge and gorgeous. I have no idea what kind, though. ~Vic

Update:
This is a Rhododendron, courtesy of a fellow blogger. Thank you!

Lavender Flowers Image
Tree of flowers.
04-07-2019

Flower for the Day

FFTD: Mums

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This is a Chrysanthemum that I planted back in 2014. It must have been very happy where I put it because it was huge two years later. It finally gave up the next year. ~Vic

Chrysanthemum Image
This is just one plant.
10-14-2016

Flower for the Day

Movie Monday: Leisurely Pedestrians 1889

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Leisurely Pedestrians Image One
Image Credit: wikipedia.org

I am going WAY back this time…back to the days of moving pictures and short films. Sticking with my five year increments, one-hundred & thirty years ago, William Friese-Greene, an English inventor, and professional photographer, shot a silent, actuality film in the Autumn of 1889. It was titled Leisurely Pedestrians, Open Topped Buses and Hansom Cabs with Trotting Horses.

From Wikipedia:

[…] shot by inventor and film pioneer William Friese-Greene on celluloid film using his ‘machine’ camera, the 20 feet of film […] was shot […] at Apsley Gate, Hyde Park, London. [It] was claimed to be the first motion picture [but] Louis Le Prince successfully shot on glass plate before 18 August 1887 and on paper negative in October 1888. It may, nonetheless, be the first moving picture film on celluloid and the first shot in London.

It is now considered a lost film with no known surviving prints and only one possible still image extant.

Leisurely Pedestrians Image Two
Image Credit: wikipedia.org

An article in This Is Bristol UK from December 17, 2009, (via The Wayback Machine) has an interview with David Friese-Greene, the great-grandson. From the article:

My great-grandfather was an idealist and a brilliant inventor, with 71 patents to his name but, he was a dreadful businessman. He died without ever having made a penny out of his inventions. He married his first wife Helena Friese when he was just 19 and incorporated her surname with his, because he felt it sounded more impressive. Tragically, Helena died at the age of 21 […].

It was during the late 1880s, shortly after Helena’s death, that Friese-Greene first began to experiment with the idea of creating moving pictures. […] in 1890, he patented [a] new device, which he dubbed the chronophotographic camera. Unfortunately, he was so pleased with his creation that, he wrote to the great American inventor, Thomas Edison, telling him what he had come up with and, even, included plans and designs […]. William never heard back from the inventor of the electric light bulb, though, the following year, Edison patented his own version of a movie camera and went down in many history books as the inventor of cinema.

In fact, William died a pauper but, [was] still passionate about his most famous creation. He was at a cinema industry meeting in London, which had been called to discuss the poor state of the British film industry in 1921. He had got to his feet to speak about his vision of how film could be used to create educational documentaries when he fell down dead. It is said he had just 21 pence in his pockets when he died.

In 1951, the movie The Magic Box was released. Starring Robert Donat, it was a biographical piece about Friese-Greene’s life.

There is additional information on this WordPress blog: William Friese-Greene & Me

FFTD: Pale Lovelies

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I was intending to do a Movie Monday but, I’m struggling with stuff older than 100 years. I will tend to that later. ~Vic

Update:
With help from a fellow blogger, the below photo is a Hellebore. Thank you!

Pale Lovelies Image
I haven’t a clue what these are but, they are so sweet (I know what these are, now!).
03-31-2019

Flower for the Day

FFTD: Unusual

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Out on one of my walks, several of these happy things were poking out through the wrought iron fence. I haven’t the first clue what this is but, it’s flower-ish, I suppose. It is quite striking. If anyone knows what this is, SPEAK. ~Vic

Update:
Thanks to another blogger, this strange flower is a Euphorbia, or Spurge, which is the same family that Poinsettias come from. This particular variety is either an amygdaloides variant called ‘Robbiae’ or, a Redwing Charam, which is a hybrid of amygdaloides and martinii. I can’t tell. Thank you!

Unusual Image
Strange, pretty plant.
04-10-2019

Flower for the Day