Throwback Thursdays

Throwback Thursday: Burr-Hamilton Duel 1804

Posted on Updated on

Burr-Hamilton Duel Image One
Image Credit: wikipedia.org

Two-hundred, fifteen years ago, today, Vice President Aaron Burr shot former Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton in a duel in Weehawken, New Jersey.

At dawn on the morning of July 11, […] political antagonists, and personal enemies, Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr met on the heights of Weehawken […], to settle their longstanding differences with a duel. The participants fired their pistols in close succession. Burr’s shot met its target immediately, fatally wounding Hamilton and leading to his death the following day. Burr escaped unharmed. This tragically extreme incident reflected the depth of animosity aroused by the first emergence of the nation’s political party system. Both men were political leaders in New York: Burr, a prominent Republican, and Hamilton, leader of the opposing Federalist Party. Burr had found himself the brunt of Hamilton’s political maneuvering on several occasions, including the unusual presidential election of 1800, in which vice-presidential candidate Burr almost defeated his running mate, presidential candidate Thomas Jefferson. In 1804, Hamilton opposed Burr’s closely fought bid for governor of New York. On the heels of this narrow defeat, Burr challenged Hamilton to a duel on the grounds that Hamilton had publicly maligned his character.

[Source]

Burr-Hamilton Duel Image Two
Image Credit:
wikipedia.org & flickr.com

Alexander Hamilton, the chief architect of America’s political economy, was born on the Caribbean island of Nevis [and] came to the American colonies in 1773 as a poor immigrant. (There is some controversy as to the year of his birth, but it was either 1755 or 1757.) In 1776, he joined the Continental Army in the American Revolution and his […] remarkable intelligence brought him to the attention of General George Washington. Aaron Burr, born into a prestigious New Jersey family in 1756, was also intellectually gifted and [..] graduated from the College of New Jersey (later Princeton) at the age of 17. He joined the Continental Army in 1775 […]. In 1790, he defeated Alexander Hamilton’s father-in-law in a race for the U.S. Senate. Hamilton came to detest Burr, whom he regarded as a dangerous opportunist, and […] often spoke ill of him.

In the 1800 election, Jefferson and Burr became running mates […]. Under the electoral procedure then prevailing, president and vice president were voted for, separately. […] the candidate who received the most votes was elected president, and the second in line, vice president. What at first seemed but an electoral technicality […] developed into a major constitutional crisis when Federalists in the lame-duck Congress threw their support behind Burr. After a remarkable 35 tie votes, a small group of Federalists changed sides and voted in Jefferson’s favor. Alexander Hamilton, who had supported Jefferson as the lesser of two evils, was instrumental in breaking the deadlock.

[Source]

Burr-Hamilton Duel Image Three
Image Credit: loc.gov

The duel was fought at a time when the practice was being outlawed in the northern United States and it had immense political ramifications. Burr survived the duel and was indicted for murder in both New York and New Jersey, though these charges were later either dismissed or resulted in acquittal. The harsh criticism and animosity directed toward him following the duel brought an end to his political career. The Federalist Party was already weakened by the defeat of John Adams in the presidential election of 1800 and was further weakened by Hamilton’s death.

[Burr] spent [many] years in Europe. He finally returned to New York City in 1812, where he resumed his law practice and spent the remainder of his life in relative obscurity.

[Source]

Throwback Thursday: 1966

Posted on Updated on

My Baby Picture
Personal Collection

Fifty-two years ago, today, I appeared (Hey!). That makes me a Solar Virgoan via Tropical Astrology and a Fire Horse via Chinese Astrology (as are all the folks born January 21, 1966 thru February 8, 1967). I was a mid-morning baby that was a little bit late (it’s warm and comfortable in there) and a full Pisces Moon showed up at 8:14pm EDT. I think I decided to hang out and wait for the full moon (howling). It’s probably why I am so fascinated and attracted to our glorious Moon.

I was born on my maternal Grandmother’s birthday. I used to joke that she and I were 51 years and 35 minutes apart. I was also her only grandchild with a different last name (there ‘were’ 10 of us). On the other side of the family, I was the first girl born into the family in three generations and the only granddaughter. I had my paternal Grandmother all to myself for 12 years. My paternal Grandfather bought a fifth of Old Grandad bourbon which he intended to drink with me when I turned 21. He didn’t make it. I still have the unopened bottle of bourbon. At one time, the label reflected bottling in 1961.

I was a Vietnam War baby. I did a post, earlier in the month, which covers my ‘almost Army Brat’ status. I hadn’t quite reached my third birthday when Neil Armstrong was heard over the air ‘small-stepping & giant-leaping’ and I wasn’t even four, yet, when Jack Swigert told Houston they’d had a problem. I was nine days old when Star Trek boldly debuted.

I was a child of the 70s and a teen of the 80s. I am one of the early Generation X group. I remember watching Scooby Doo, Super Friends and Looney Tunes (Bugs Bunny & Tweety Show) on Saturday mornings. Afternoons after school, it was Sesame Street and The Electric Company. I remember The Carol Burnette Show, The Donnie & Marie Show, Dance Fever and Solid Gold. I loved watching One Day At A Time, Charlie’s Angels, The Bionic Woman, Happy Days and Wonder Woman. I also watched ‘wrastlin’ with my dad and just about every cop show you could think of (he controlled the TV most of the time). I was 11 when I bought my first album Surf & Drag. I was 13 when everyone was wondering “Who shot J.R.?”. I was just shy of my 15th birthday when MTV was born. My first rock concert was The Police: Synchronicity Tour. I also got to see England Dan & John Ford Coley in 1976 at Carowinds with my mom.

I graduated high school at 17 in 1984…yeah, the same year as the scary book. I wasn’t even close to my 20th birthday when I watched the Challenger Space Shuttle explode in stunned silence. Twelve days after my 35th birthday, I watched, again, in stunned silence as two planes flew into the Twin Towers and Flight 93 crashed in rural Pennsylvania. Things were never the same after that day.

So much has changed from the world I grew up in. ~Victoria

People I share a birthday with:
Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley 1797
Frederick ‘Fred’ Martin MacMurray 1908
Theodore Samuel ‘Ted’ Williams 1918
Kitty Wells (Ellen Muriel Deason) 1919
Geoffrey Beene (Samuel Albert Bozeman, Jr.) 1927
William Edward ‘Bill’ Daily, Jr. 1927
Warren Edward Buffett 1930
John Leonard ‘Jack’ Swigert, Jr. 1931
John Edmund Andrew Phillips 1935
Bruce Leslie McLaren 1937
Frank Edwin ‘Tug’ McGraw, Jr. 1944
Margaret Ann ‘Peggy’ Lipton 1946
Lewis Niles Black 1948
Timothy James Bottoms 1951
Anna Stepanovna Politkovskaya 1958
Gary Ivan Gordon 1960
Alexander Valterovich Litvinenko 1962
Michael Charles Chiklis 1963
Michael Michele Williams 1966

Throwback Thursday: Klondike Gold Rush 1896

Posted on

Klondike Gold Rush Image
Photo Credit: history.com

Klondike Rush Routes Image
Photo Credit: wikimedia.org

GOLD! It’s in them, there hills! August 16, 1896, gold was discovered in Dawson City, Bonanza Creek, Klondike River, Yukon, Canada. George Carmack, his wife Kate, her brother ‘Skookum’ Jim Mason (Keish) and Dawson (Tagish) Charlie began looking for gold on one of the river’s tributaries. History is still unclear on ‘who’ actually made the discovery but, George Carmack is generally referred to as the claim maker.

After the panics of 1893 and 1896, economic depression, inflation and unemployment were rampant. The Coinage Act of 1873 had destroyed the use of silver dollar coins, dropping the price of silver and ending bi-metallism. This prompted many to dash to the area in search of gold, leaving behind other jobs in a quest for adventure and financial security. Even author Jack London headed north for his fair share and many of his novels were born out of his experiences. Pacific port towns reaped the benefits of the traders and travelers, desperate to survive the economic downturn.

Very few walked away from Dawson City rich. George and Kate split and, George remarried, living fairly well on his earnings. Skookum Jim, though wealthy, continued to prospect until his death. Dawson Charlie spent money and drank too much, dying in an alcohol related accident. Most of the businessmen and miners died penniless. The damage to the area from the mining was extensive and, the Native people suffered from contaminated water and disease.

Although this song is based on a John Wayne movie, and the George mentioned isn’t the same George in history, it’s still apropos…and, a great song. It’s sad, though, that Johnny Horton died shortly before its release.