february 16

POTD: Stickwork Sculpture 3.0

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I’ve posted this sculpture twice, before…here & here. This will be my last installment as I only had a few shots and this shot isn’t even mine. This photo was part of a larger group of snow shots I posted about here & here.

Since it is SO HOT outside, I thought I would cool your mind a bit. ~Vic

Stickwork Sculpture Snow Image
Photo Credit: Tim Woody
(I have no idea who he is despite searching.)
From the January 2018 Snow Bomb
01-18-2018

Throwback Thursday: Naval Aviation First 1910

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Eugene Ely Image One
Photo Credit: wikipedia.org & wikimedia.org

One hundred, nine years ago, today, aviator Eugene Ely made naval aviation history, taking off from a wooden platform secured to the bow of the light cruiser USS Birmingham. Captain Washington Chambers, USN, was tasked by the Secretary of the Navy George von Lengerke Meyer to investigate uses for aviation in the Navy. Ely successfully took off in a Curtiss Pusher from the Birmingham, barely. The airplane rolled off the platform, plunged downward, skipping the water, which damaged the propeller but, he managed to stay airborne, landing two and a half miles away on Willoughby Spit. Two months later, on January 18, 1911, Ely landed his Curtiss Pusher airplane on a platform on the armored cruiser USS Pennsylvania anchored in San Francisco Bay.

Ely communicated with the United States Navy requesting employment but, United States naval aviation was not yet organized. Ely continued flying in exhibitions while Captain Chambers promised to “keep him in mind” if Navy flying stations were created.

On October 19, 1911, while flying at an exhibition in Macon, Georgia, his plane was late pulling out of a dive and crashed. Ely jumped clear of the wrecked aircraft but, his neck was broken and he died a few minutes later.

On February 16, 1933, Congress awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross posthumously to Ely, “for extraordinary achievement as a pioneer civilian aviator and for his significant contribution to the development of aviation in the United States Navy.”

Naval Aviation Hall of Fame

Eugene Ely Image Two
Photo Credit: airandspace.si.edu

Shutterbug Saturday: Living History

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Living History Day Image One
Brochure

Today was Living History Day. I didn’t make it to the festivities but, my buddy Ray did. The weather was just too damp for me and I was busy with other things. He graciously provided me with copies to post and four short video clips.

This area (a five county span) was a hotbed of struggle during the War of the Regulation, the Battle of Alamance, the Revolutionary War, the Battle of Guilford Court House, the Civil War and was the site of the last & largest Confederate Surrender. We, collectively, have seen a lot.

We also have a lot of actors and reenactments. Some of the uniforms and gear are quite impressive. Hopefully, I will make it next year.

The Captain Image Two
Photo Credit: All Images Are From A. R. Tutterow
Oh, Captain, My Captain
The Drummers Image Three
Young drummers. You can’t march without a beat.
Redcoats Image Four
The line-up.
Redcoats Image Five
Rogue ammunition.
The Women Image Six
Era clothing and food.
Farm Office Image Seven
This building was used as an office by Confederate Generals Wade Hampton & Joseph E. Johnston. It was built in 1850 & moved to this location in 1983. The Visitor’s Center in the background, a former farm-house, wasn’t built until 1790.
The Hessian Image Eight
Hessian Uniform
German Mercenary

Ray had a little trouble keeping his filming steady. Overcast skies can interfere with viewing ability. Apologies.