1966

Flashback Friday: 1966

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Pencil Portrait
Artist: Wendy T. Wallace
Drawn: 11-25-1994

Fifty-three years ago…10:38am. I did a post last year with more background information and some nostalgia.

I stopped posting on July 15, as the following day, I wound up in the ER. As my maternal grandmother would say “I had a spell with my heart.” Luckily, it turned out to be nothing life threatening but, it scared me. After six weeks of rest and some lifestyle changes, I’m good.

I’m not fond of a lot of fanfare regarding my birthday. I prefer to have the day to myself. I’m mostly an introvert but, I can be extroverted for short periods of time. Here is a personal toast to still being upright and walking.

My likeness was sketched by artist Wendy T. Wallace of Greensboro, back in November of 1994. I sat for her at a Christmas shopping festival at the Greensboro Coliseum…as I recall. This was ten years after high school graduation.

Throwback Thursday: Memorial Day

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Memorial Day Image One
Image Credit: youtube

Memorial Day, as celebrated, has come and gone. The weekend BBQs and party gatherings are over. Some folks have returned to work after their Monday off while others took the entire week off and, possibly, headed to the beach to herald the “summer season”. I am posting, today, because from 1868 to 1970, Memorial Day was observed on May 30.

Our American Memorial Day has quite a rich, lengthy history and one that has its own area of research. Columbus State University in Georgia has a Center For Memorial Day Research and the University of Mississippi in Oxford has The Center For Civil War Research that covers Memorial Day in their data.

So, what IS the origin of our Memorial Day? That’s a good question and the following took two days to research.

May we remember them, ALL. ~Vic

Warrenton, Virginia 1861

A newspaper article from the Richmond Times-Dispatch in 1906 reflects Warrenton‘s claims that the first Confederate Memorial Day was June 3, 1861…the location of the first Civil War soldier’s grave ever to be decorated.

Arlington Heights, Virginia 1862

On April 16, 1862, some ladies and a chaplain from Michigan […] proposed gathering some flowers and laying them on the graves of the Michigan soldiers that day. They did so and the next year, they decorated the same graves.

Savannah, Georgia 1862

Women in Savannah decorated soldiers’ graves on July 21, 1862 according the the Savannah Republican.

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 1863

The November 19, 1863, cemetery dedication at Gettysburg was a ceremony of commemoration at the graves of dead soldiers. Some have, therefore, claimed that President Abraham Lincoln was the founder of Memorial Day.

Boalsburg, Pennsylvania 1864

On July 4, 1864, ladies decorated soldiers’ graves according to local historians in Boalsburg. Boalsburg promotes itself as the birthplace of Memorial Day.

Knoxville, Tennessee 1865

The first decoration of the graves of Union soldiers of which there is any record was witnessed by Surgeon Fred W. Byers, of the [96th] Illinois volunteer infantry, now surgeon general of the National Guard of the State of Wisconsin (Spring 1865).

Jackson, Mississippi 1865

The incident in Mrs. [Sue Landon Adams] Vaughan’s life, which assured her name a permanent place in history, occurred at Jackson […] when she founded Decoration Day by first decorating the graves of Confederate and Federal soldiers alike, in a Jackson cemetery on April 26, 1865.

Kingston, Georgia 1865

An historic road-side marker indicates Kingston as the location of the “First Decoration, or Memorial Day” (Late April 1865).

Charleston, South Carolina 1865

On May 1, 1865, in Charleston, recently freed African-Americans reburied Union soldiers originally buried in a mass grave in a Confederate prison camp. The event was reported in Charleston and northern newspapers and, some historians today cite it as “the first Decoration Day.”

Memorial Day Image Two
Photo Credit: time.com

Columbus, Mississippi 1866

Thus was established a custom which has become national in its adoption – Decoration Day – having its origin with the ladies of Columbus. Columbus also claims the distinction of being the first to decorate the graves of both Confederate and Federal soldiers, alike (Friendship Cemetery April 25, 1866). [See the poem The Blue & The Gray by Francis Miles Finch}

Columbus, Georgia 1866

To the State of Georgia belongs the credit of having inaugurated what has since become the universal custom of decorating annually the graves of the heroic dead. The initial ceremonies which ushered Memorial Day into life were held in Linnwood Cemetery, at Columbus, on April 26, 1866.

Memphis, Tennessee 1866

Yesterday was the day appointed throughout the South as a day of sweet remembrance for our brothers who now sleep their last long sleep, the sleep of death. That day (the 26th day of April) has, and will be, set apart, annually, as a day to be commemorated by all the purely Southern people in the country, as that upon which we are to lay aside our usual vocations of life and, devote to the memory of our friends, brothers, husbands and sons, who have fallen in our late struggle for Southern independence.

Carbondale, Illinois 1866

A stone marker in Carbondale claims that place as the location of the first Decoration Day, honoring the Union soldiers buried there. General John A. Logan, who would later become commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, the largest of the Union veterans’ organizations, officiated at the ceremony (April 29, 1866).

Waterloo, New York 1866

On Saturday, May 5, 1866, the first complete observance of what is now known as Memorial Day was held in Waterloo. On May 26, 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson designated an “official” birthplace of the holiday by signing the presidential proclamation naming Waterloo, New York, as the holder of the title.

Richmond, Virginia 1866

The anniversary of the death of Stonewall Jackson was observed to-day by floral decorations of the graves of Confederate soldiers at Hollywood and Oakwood (May 10, 1866).

May 3, 1866 [they] formed the Ladies’ Hollywood Memorial Association, with the immediate aim of caring for and commemorating the graves of Confederate soldiers. All disposed to co-operate with us will repair, in such groups and at such hours as may be convenient, on Thursday, May 31st, 1866, to Hollywood Cemetery, to mark, by every appropriate means in our power, our sense of the heroic services and sacrifices of those who were dear to us in life and we honored in death.

Petersburg, Virginia 1866

It was in May of this year, 1866, that we inaugurated, in Petersburg, the custom, now universal, of decorating the graves of those who fell in the Civil War. Our intention was simply to lay a token of our gratitude and affection upon the graves of the brave citizens who fell June 9, 1864, in defence of Petersburg…

Memorial Day Image Three
Image Credit: pdxretro.com & cardcow.com

Southern Appalachian Decoration Day

From The Bitter Southerner:

Dinner on the grounds is not a phrase I hear these days. Just reading the phrase takes me back to those times with my grandmother at her church on […] Decoration Day Sunday. I grew up in north Alabama in the 1960s. Dinner on the grounds was a special occasion that followed the work of cleaning up the graveyard and placing fresh flowers beside the headstones. It provided a time to remember and celebrate the lives of the dear departed. ~Betsy Sanders

Today, we are here to eat, remember and bask in the Southern fascination of death […]. It’s Decoration Day. The South claims death with as much loyalty as we claim our children. J.T. Lowery, a former pastor […] misses when Decoration Day meant keeping company with headstones during dinner on the ground. Opal Flannigan is depending on women […] to uphold a tradition so old it’s hard to say when it emerged. German and Scots-Irish immigrants who birthed much of the Southern Appalachia’s culture in Virginia, Tennessee and the Carolinas likely brought these traditions [with them]. ~Jennifer Crossley Howard

From UNC Press Blog:

Many rural community cemeteries in western North Carolina hold “decorations.” A decoration is a religious service in the cemetery when people decorate graves to pay respect to the dead. The group assembles at outdoor tables, sometime in an outdoor pavilion, for the ritual “dinner on the ground.” There are variations of this pattern but, the overall pattern is fairly consistent.

Nationwide Observance 1868

In 1866, veterans of the Union army formed the beginnings of the Grand Army of the Republic, a fraternal organization designed expressly to provide aid, comfort and political advocacy for veterans’ issues in post-war America. In 1868, the leadership of the G. A. R. sought through the following order to have the various local and regional observances of decorating soldier graves made into something like a national tradition.

Headquarters Grand Army Of The Republic
Adjutant-General’s Office, 446 Fourteenth St.
Washington, D. C., May 5, 1868.
General Orders No. 11.

From The History Channel:

By proclamation of General John A. Logan of the Grand Army of the Republic, the first major Memorial Day observance is held to honor those who died “in defense of their country during the late rebellion.” Known to some as “Decoration Day,” mourners honored the Civil War dead by decorating their graves with flowers. On the first Decoration Day, General James Garfield made a speech at Arlington National Cemetery, after which 5,000 participants helped to decorate the graves of the more than 20,000 Union and Confederate soldiers buried in the cemetery.

The 1868 celebration was inspired by local observances that had taken place in various locations in the three years since the end of the Civil War. In fact, several cities claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day, including Columbus, Mississippi; Macon, Georgia; Richmond, Virginia; Boalsburg, Pennsylvania; and Carbondale, Illinois. In 1966, the federal government, under the direction of President Lyndon B. Johnson, declared Waterloo, New York, the official birthplace of Memorial Day. They chose Waterloo, which had first celebrated the day on May 5, 1866, because the town had made Memorial Day an annual, community-wide event, during which businesses closed and, residents decorated the graves of soldiers with flowers and flags.

By the late 19th century, many communities across the country had begun to celebrate Memorial Day and, after World War I, observers began to honor the dead of all of America’s wars. In 1971, Congress declared Memorial Day a national holiday to be celebrated the last Monday in May. Today, Memorial Day is celebrated at Arlington National Cemetery with a ceremony in which a small American flag is placed on each grave. It is customary for the president or vice president to give a speech honoring the contributions of the dead and to lay a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. More than 5,000 people attend the ceremony annually. Several Southern states continue to set aside a special day for honoring the Confederate dead, which is usually called Confederate Memorial Day.

Tune Tuesday: May 14, 1979

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Peaches & Herb Image One
Photo Credit: mm-group.org

Forty years ago, today, the #1 song on the Billboard Hot R&B chart (and the Hot 100 chart, simultaneously, plus Cash Box) was Reunited by Peaches & Herb (Herb Fame & Linda “Peaches #3” Greene). The song was co-written by Dino Fekaris and Freddie Perren, whom also co-wrote Shake Your Groove Thing, a previous Peaches & Herb song and, I Will Survive, the Gloria Gaynor hit. This was a sequel piece to the duo’s (Herb Fame & Francine “Peaches” Hurd Barker) previous song (We’ll Be) United released in 1968, a cover of The Intruders hit from 1966.

The song sold over two million copies, was the Billboard #5 song for 1979 and the RPM (Canadian) #9 song for 1979 (Wayback Machine). Artists Louise Mandrell (with husband R. C. Bannon), Faith No More and Lulu (with Cliff Richard) have done cover versions. [This link reflects David Hasselhoff and Raven-Symone as cover artists but, I can’t verify. ~Vic]

Nominated for:
American Music Award: Favorite Soul/R&B Song
Grammy: Best R&B Vocal Performance By A Duo, Group Or Chorus


 
Lyrics
[Verse 1:]
I was a fool to ever leave your side
Me minus you is such a lonely ride
The breakup we had
Has made me lonesome and sad
I realize I love you cause
I want you back, hey, hey

I spent the evening with the radio
Regret the moment that I let you go
Our quarrel was such
A way of learning so much
I know now that I love you
Cause I need your touch, hey, hey

[Chorus:]
Reunited
And it feels so good
Reunited
Cause we understood

There`s one perfect fit
And sugar, this one is it
We both are so excited
Cause we`re reunited
Hey, hey

[Verse 2:]
I sat here staring
At the same old wall
Came back to life just when I got your call

I wished I could climb right
Through the telephone line
And give you what you want
So you will still be mine
Hey, hey

I can’t go cheating
Honey, I can’t play
I found it very hard to stay away

As we reminisce on
Precious moments like this
I`m glad we`re back together
Cause I missed your kiss
Hey, hey

[Repeat Chorus:]
Reunited
And it feels so good
Reunited
Cause we understood

There`s one perfect fit
And sugar, this one is it
We both are so excited
Cause we`re reunited
Hey, hey

Yeah, yeah, yeah, baby

[Verse 3:]
Oh, lover, lover
This is solid love
And you`re exactly what I`m dreaming of

All through the day
And all through the night
I`ll give you all the love I have
With all my might
Hey, hey

[Repeat Chorus:]
Reunited
And it feels so good
Reunited
Cause we understood

There`s one perfect fit
And sugar, this one is it…

30-Day Song Challenge: Day 18

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Music Challenge Image
Photo Credit: goodreads.com

A song from the year you were born…

I read over the long list of songs released in 1966. There’s a lot of good stuff in there and I had a hard time choosing. Here are six absolute favorites, listed in the order they came out:

January
Billboard’s #1 single for 1966


 

April
Also re-released in 1970, a version I dislike.


 

June
#2 on Billboard Hot 100


 

July
#6 on Billboard Hot 100


 

July
#5 on Billboard Hot 100


 

November
#2 on Billboard Hot 100

Throwback Thursday: 1966

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My Baby Picture
Personal Collection

Fifty-two years ago, today, I appeared (Hey!). That makes me a Solar Virgoan via Tropical Astrology and a Fire Horse via Chinese Astrology (as are all the folks born January 21, 1966 thru February 8, 1967). I was a mid-morning baby that was a little bit late (it’s warm and comfortable in there) and a full Pisces Moon showed up at 8:14pm EDT. I think I decided to hang out and wait for the full moon (howling). It’s probably why I am so fascinated and attracted to our glorious Moon.

I was born on my maternal Grandmother’s birthday. I used to joke that she and I were 51 years and 35 minutes apart. I was also her only grandchild with a different last name (there ‘were’ 10 of us). On the other side of the family, I was the first girl born into the family in three generations and the only granddaughter. I had my paternal Grandmother all to myself for 12 years. My paternal Grandfather bought a fifth of Old Grandad bourbon which he intended to drink with me when I turned 21. He didn’t make it. I still have the unopened bottle of bourbon. At one time, the label reflected bottling in 1961.

I was a Vietnam War baby. I did a post, earlier in the month, which covers my ‘almost Army Brat’ status. I hadn’t quite reached my third birthday when Neil Armstrong was heard over the air ‘small-stepping & giant-leaping’ and I wasn’t even four, yet, when Jack Swigert told Houston they’d had a problem. I was nine days old when Star Trek boldly debuted.

I was a child of the 70s and a teen of the 80s. I am one of the early Generation X group. I remember watching Scooby Doo, Super Friends and Looney Tunes (Bugs Bunny & Tweety Show) on Saturday mornings. Afternoons after school, it was Sesame Street and The Electric Company. I remember The Carol Burnette Show, The Donnie & Marie Show, Dance Fever and Solid Gold. I loved watching One Day At A Time, Charlie’s Angels, The Bionic Woman, Happy Days and Wonder Woman. I also watched ‘wrastlin’ with my dad and just about every cop show you could think of (he controlled the TV most of the time). I was 11 when I bought my first album Surf & Drag. I was 13 when everyone was wondering “Who shot J.R.?”. I was just shy of my 15th birthday when MTV was born. My first rock concert was The Police: Synchronicity Tour. I also got to see England Dan & John Ford Coley in 1976 at Carowinds with my mom.

I graduated high school at 17 in 1984…yeah, the same year as the scary book. I wasn’t even close to my 20th birthday when I watched the Challenger Space Shuttle explode in stunned silence. Twelve days after my 35th birthday, I watched, again, in stunned silence as two planes flew into the Twin Towers and Flight 93 crashed in rural Pennsylvania. Things were never the same after that day.

So much has changed from the world I grew up in. ~Victoria

People I share a birthday with:
Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley 1797
Frederick ‘Fred’ Martin MacMurray 1908
Theodore Samuel ‘Ted’ Williams 1918
Kitty Wells (Ellen Muriel Deason) 1919
Geoffrey Beene (Samuel Albert Bozeman, Jr.) 1927
William Edward ‘Bill’ Daily, Jr. 1927
Warren Edward Buffett 1930
John Leonard ‘Jack’ Swigert, Jr. 1931
John Edmund Andrew Phillips 1935
Bruce Leslie McLaren 1937
Frank Edwin ‘Tug’ McGraw, Jr. 1944
Margaret Ann ‘Peggy’ Lipton 1946
Lewis Niles Black 1948
Timothy James Bottoms 1951
Anna Stepanovna Politkovskaya 1958
Gary Ivan Gordon 1960
Alexander Valterovich Litvinenko 1962
Michael Charles Chiklis 1963
Michael Michele Williams 1966