Photography

Shutterbug Saturday: Tribute Pictures 2.0

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Pennybacker Bridge Image One
Photo Credit: Ryan Barron on Unsplash
The Percy V. Pennybacker, Jr., Bridge on Loop 360, Capital of Texas Highway, Austin

In my previous post from November 24, I spoke of my former supervisor, W. H. Patton, whom I worked for, and with, from September of 2002 until he retired in May of 2007. This is Part Two of a five-part series. Below are more of his photography works.

Bobcats Image Two
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his ranch in 2007, a pair of Bobcats
Bobcat Image Three
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his driveway, 09-16-2008
Bobcat Image Four
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his driveway, 09-16-2008
Bobcat Image Five
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his backyard, 09-16-2008
Mockingbirds Image Six
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his back patio, The Quartet 08-10-2008
Mockingbirds Image Seven
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his back patio, The Texas State Bird Chorus & a couple of wasps 08-10-2008
Cardinal Image Eight
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his back patio, 07-23-2007
Rabbit Image Nine
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his backyard, 07-23-2007

Shutterbug Saturday: Tribute Pictures

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Congress Avenue Image One
Photo Credit: Ryan Wallace on Unsplash
Texas State Capitol Building

I lived and worked in Texas for nearly a decade. I was fortunate enough to snag a Texas State job for the majority of the time I was there. The gentleman that interviewed and hired me was, as it turns out, my immediate Supervisor. He was one of the best bosses I ever had (his replacement after retirement was just as terrific). He did his job and he let me do mine. We sometimes rode the bus together, to and from work (downtown Austin).

I grew to love this man. He was a lanky 6′ 6″ and spoke fluent Spanish with a Texan accent. He had to have heart valve surgery a decade before I met him and, when you got close to him, he ticked like a clock. He owned a ranch just outside of Abilene in a small town called Clyde. He was a cattleman, a businessman, a photographer, a writer, an artist, a musician, a pilot, interviewed two U.S. Presidents and, was good friends with Mac Davis, Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton. He graduated Texas Tech with a Journalism degree, loved the Red Raiders and served in the U.S. Army Reserves:

“I protected Fort Leonard Wood, MO, from all enemies, foreign and domestic, during the Cuban missile crisis” ~ W. H. Patton

He lived all over the U.S. and Mexico. He moved to the Austin area in 1997 and I met him in 2002. He always had a story to tell and had a wicked sense of humor. He was one hell of a cook and drank like a fish. I am thankful that I met him and am a better person for it. He passed away in 2012, five days after his 73rd birthday. I’d like to share some of his work, as he shared it with me.

Azaleas Image Two
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From the 1960s, his son fishing.
Barn Owl Image Three
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From the 1960s, he managed to capture the image of a Barn Owl in an abandoned house.
Geese Image Four
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From the 1960s, local geese.
Kodiak Bear Image Five
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From the 1960s, Kodiak bear.
Wood Duck Image Six
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From the 1960s, a wood duck.
Hummingbird Image Seven
Photo Credit: W. H. Patton
From his backyard, 04-08-2008
Dove Art Image Eight
W. H. Patton pencil rendering…1977
Eagle Image Nine
W. H. Patton pencil rendering…1977

Beaver Moon 2018

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Beaver Moon Image One
Personal Collection 11-05-2017

Well, so much for capturing this evening’s Beaver Moon. I guess I should have tried last night. Tonight is way too foggy. Instead, I present to you my shots from last November.

Also known as the Frosty Moon, it can be referred to as a Mourning Moon if it happens to be the last full moon before the Winter Solstice, as is the case this year.

Beaver Moon Image Two
Personal Collection 11-05-2017

 

Moon Giant Image Three
Photo Credit: moongiant.com

From MoonGiant:

November’s Full Moon was one of the most important of the year for Northern American communities. Most commonly known as the Full Beaver Moon, this Full Moon marked a time when rivers would begin to freeze over, making it impossible to set out traps. Many Native American tribes, including the Cree, Arapaho and, Abenaki tribes, called November’s full moon the “Moon When Rivers Start to Freeze”.

With the changing of the seasons, November’s full moon marks the beginning of the end. This year, it is the very last full moon before the winter solstice, which makes it the Mourning Moon according to Pagan tradition. In many different cultures, November’s full moon is intimately connected with death and loss, on both a literal and symbolic level. The Celts, for instance, called it the Reed Moon, comparing the mournful music made by wind instruments to the ghoulish sounds of spirits being drawn into the underworld. And, not without good reason…the Full Mourning Moon marks a dangerous time of the year where people could easily slip into the underworld with a single misstep.

We may enjoy the luxury of winter coats and central heating, now but, freezing to death during the long, dark winters used to be a very real threat to early inhabitants of Northern America. In order to survive, making warm winter clothing out of beaver fur was crucial for American colonists and Native American tribes. This is why November’s full moon is also known as the Beaver Moon. During this month, beavers are very active, working hard on dam construction and this was a good time to start harvesting their fur. Missing the timing for this would mean death for these early Northern American communities. This name drives home the importance of November’s full moon as a signal for these Native American tribes to begin trapping beavers before it was too late, as well as to complete their preparations for the darkest depths of winter.

For the Pagans, on the other hand, the final stage of their winter preparations involved the very important process of “mourning”, which is why they call the last moon before the winter solstice the Mourning Moon. After a full year of accumulating possessions, both physically and otherwise, the Mourning Moon is the perfect time to let go of old, unnecessary things, while giving yourself permission to mourn their passing. Practicing Pagans may perform a moonlit ritual where they write down the things they want to rid themselves of and ask their Goddess for help in removing unwanted burdens.

Pagan traditions aside, anyone can benefit from taking the time to self-reflect and to let go. Take advantage of the Full Mourning Moon this November to look back on your year. Take stock of your desires, ambitions, mental and behavioral habits and, the people you spend your energy on. Clean your living and work spaces and, sort out the physical objects that are not contributing to your well-being. Take the time to fully mourn and let go of anything, or anyone, that does not bring you joy, so that you can begin to move forward, unfettered, towards a lighter and happier new year.

Beaver Moon Image Four
Personal Collection 11-05-2017

 

100% illumination occurred at 12:39am EST.

Howl for me… ~Vic

Shutterbug Saturday: Halloween Local

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Neighbors with humor… All pictures are my personal collection. ~Vic

Halloween Image One
Uniquitiques Store
They decorate every year. Last year was better than this year.
10-13-2017
Halloween Image Two
This house didn’t decorate this year.
11-04-2017
Halloween Image Three
This is either a large rat or a small dog. You decide.
10-06-2018
Halloween Image Five
Backseat of a pickup truck. At least he is wearing his seatbelt.
10-13-2018
Halloween Image Four
I love the pipe skeleton.
10-18-2018
Halloween Image Six
He is well fed.
10-24-2018
Halloween Image Seven
Bats and spiders. I think they need an exterminator.
10-24-2018
Halloween Image Eigth
Heyyyyyyyy!
10-24-2018
Halloween Image Nine
Same guy last year. What a ham.
10-20-2017
Halloween Image Ten
There seems to be a rather large concentration of skeletons here.
10-06-2018
Halloween Image Eleven
Whoops! Chased by a rogue skeleton.
10-06-2018

Same house a year ago.

Hunter’s Moon 2018

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Hunter Moon Image One
Personal Collection
Hunter Moon Image Two
Personal Collection
Hunter Moon Image Three
Personal Collection
Hunter Moon Image Four
Personal Collection
Hunter Moon Image Five
Personal Collection

The leaves are falling. The deer have grown fat for the winter. Hunters can move more easily over cleared fields, spotting the smaller animals. Also known as the Blood Moon or Sanguine Moon, Native Americans named the moon for the hunt and the storing of meat for the winter. Traditionally, it was a feasting day in Western Europe and among many tribes. From Moon Giant:

Contrary to popular belief, the Hunter’s Moon isn’t actually bigger or brighter than usual. It simply rises earlier, soon after sunset, which would give hunters plenty of bright moonlight to hunt by during the early evenings. To Neo-Pagans, however, the Hunter’s Moon is known by a far more morbid name – the Blood Moon.

Humans through the ages have always found autumn’s full moons to be creepy and not without good reason. There’s a reason why English folks in the Middle Ages called October’s full moon the Blood Moon and it’s the exact same reason why even Halloween imagery today often features a large, low-hanging moon with an eerie reddish glow. The Hunter’s Moon rises early in the evening, which means that you are more likely to see it near the horizon. When you observe the moon while it’s near the horizon, it gives off the illusion of being bigger while it’s in fact the same size. In addition, observing the moon at the horizon makes it look redder. This is because you’re seeing it through a thicker atmosphere, which scatters more blue light and lets more red light pass through to reach your eyes.

Scientific explanations aside, the Hunter’s Moon or Blood Moon still holds an undeniable aura of mystique and power. As October’s full moon occurs right before Samhain, the Gaelic mid-autumn festival that has evolved into Halloween today, Neo-Pagans consider the month of the Blood Moon to be a special time denoting the change of seasons and, a prime opportunity to contact dead loved ones, given the thinning of the veil between the physical world and the spiritual world. Precious stones such as amethyst are used to ward off evil and, sacred flowers like chrysanthemum are used when working with spirits, such as in rituals to commune with long-dead ancestors.

Despite the Blood Moon’s spooky associations, it rarely actually happens on Samhain or Halloween night itself. The next time you’ll get to see the full moon on Halloween is 2020, and if you miss that, you’ll have to wait 15 years to see it in 2035. Sometimes, October’s full moon even happens early enough in the month that it becomes the Harvest Moon, which is defined as the full moon that’s closest to the fall equinox. In Chinese culture, the Harvest Moon is celebrated during the Mid-Autumn Festival, where people gather to celebrate by eating mooncakes. There is also a harvest festival in India that celebrates October’s full moon called Sharad Purnima. Devotees fast all day before offering delicacies to the Moon God under the moonlight.

In contrast to the day-long fast of India’s moonlight festival, the Hunter’s Moon was a very important feast day in Europe as well as for many Native American tribes. Appropriately, the Ponca tribe’s name for the Hunter’s Moon is “the moon when they store food in caches”. Taking advantage of the fact that the fields have been reaped, hunters would capture foxes and other small animals who come out to graze on the fallen grains as well as hunt down deer in the moonlight. They would butcher their prey and preserve their meat. Blood Moon is an excellent name for this month’s full moon, given that it was a final, bloody harvesting of meat before the winter months.

Sadly, the tradition of feasting during the Hunter’s Moon was lost around the year 1700, but its spirit still lives on in historical reenactments like the Feast of the Hunter’s Moon, or even the feast of candy enjoyed by trick-or-treaters everywhere on Halloween.

This Hunter’s Moon reached 100% illumination at 12:45pm EDT.

Howl for me…
~Victoria

Shutterbug Saturday: The Wall That Heals

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The Wall That Heals Image One
All Photos Are Personal Collection 10-19-2018

Yesterday, my friend Ray and I went to see The Wall That Heals. It came to Wake Forest, NC, over the weekend, sponsored by the Wake Forest Purple Heart Foundation and held at the E. Carroll Joyner Park.

In a previous post, I talked about nearly being an Army brat. I also could have potentially been fatherless as 2nd Lieutenants had short life spans in Vietnam, but…that was not my fate…nor, the fate of my father.

I do not personally know anyone that died in Vietnam. I have no names to scratch for my own memories but, my partner, my ‘significant other’ knew many that perished as he was in country 1967-1968 with the Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 74 (PDF) at Camp Haskins-South, Red Beach, Da Nang . There will be a future post on him.

Veteran Dave Image Two
A veteran named Dave. He was grieving and I gave him a copy of this.
Travis & Mark Image Three
A veteran named Travis (left). A veteran named Mark. Each received a copy.
Mother & Daughter Image Four
Mother and daughter. I tried to share to the daughter but, I messed up the phone number.


Ray Image Five
Ray scanning names.

Little Ones Image Six
The little ones with their Mom. She wanted them to understand.
Cover Image Seven
Veteran Travis left a ball cap/cover for his USS Oriskany shipmates that perished in a fire in 10-26-1966. The two reflections are me & veteran Travis.
Dale R Buis Image Eight
Dale R. Buis, the first casualty.
Van De Geer Image Nine
Richard Van De Geer, the last ‘known’ casualty.
Flags Image Ten
Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines & Coast Guard (right to left).

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~Never Forget~

Shutterbug Saturday: October Beauty

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All photos are my personal collection ©. ~Vic


Mum Image One
Front porch Mums.
10-13-2018


Coleus Image Two
A Coleus farm amid the weeds.
10-13-2018


Happy Bee Image Three
The happy bee.
10-13-2018


Fuchsia & Red Mums Image Four
Fuchsia & red Mums.
Side patio.
10-13-2018


October Berries Image Five
October berries.
10-13-2018


October Rose Image Six
October Rose
10-13-2018



October Sun Image Seven
My friend Ray in the October sun.
10-13-2018


Orange/Yellow Mum Image Eight
Beautiful orange & yellow Mum in my concrete planter.
10-13-2018


Lavendar Flowers Image Nine
Lavender flowers in the Turnip Patch Park.
I wish I knew what they were.
10-06-2018


October Sunset Image Ten
October sunset.
10-13-2018

Shutterbug Saturday: Loving Fall

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The leaves, the leaves are falling…

A pathway in our local Riverwalk.

Image One
Personal Collection 09-23-2018

Local pink Mums.

Personal Collection 10-06-2018

One of many resting benches along the Riverwalk.

Personal Collection 09-23-2018

Lovely lavender Mums.

Personal Collection 10-06-2018

One of several Riverwalk bridges.

Personal Collection 09-23-2018

I spent my day running errands, enjoying walking the Riverwalk and getting my beloved Mum collection. When I walked out of the house at Noon, the temperature was 72°. I love this time of year. I just wish the mosquitoes would go away, already. ~Victoria

Harvest Moon 2018

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Well. I was intending to take pictures of the Moon and post them. Alas, that just isn’t happening. We have cloud cover so thick, I can’t even see a faint glow. Bummer.

Traditionally referred to as the Harvest Moon due to the fact that it is the full moon closest to the Autumnal Equinox, this Moon is also known as the Corn Moon and the Fruit Moon. This Moon was important to early farmers because they had more bright moon nights to gather crops. Corn, pumpkins, squash, beans and wild rice, the primary Native American staples, are now ready for gathering.

100% full illumination occurred just a bit, ago, at 10:52pm EDT.

The three pix, below, are from the full moon on September 6, 2017.

Personal Collection 09-06-2017
Personal Collection 09-06-2017
Personal Collection 09-06-2017

Howl for me…
~Victoria ❤

Autumnal Equinox 2018

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A beautiful moth in the butterfly garden of Gold Park.

Image One
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

These golden beauties line the walkway at Gold Park.

Image Two
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

These look like a distant cousin of Coreopsis.

Image Three
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

Baby pine tree.

Image Four
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

That is a handcrafted bee hotel at Gold Park.

Image Five
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

One week ago, the Eno was completely out of its banks.

Image Six
Personal Collection 09-22-2018

 

Soothing sounds. I could listen to this all day.

 

It was a wonderful walk. There was a breeze and the temperature was in the higher 80s instead of the 90s. Fall is finally here. The local trees’ leaves aren’t changing color just yet but, many are ‘leaf dropping’, including the huge Maple tree in my front yard. I sat in my Adirondack for a couple of hours, journaling. I look forward to the mosquitoes leaving. They are still here. ~Victoria

The Autumnal Equinox for this area of the Northern Hemisphere was at 9:54pm EDT.

From www.almanac.com:

Why is it called ‘an equinox’?
The word comes from the Latin aequus, meaning “equal” and nox, meaning “night”.

During the equinox, the Sun crosses what we call the “celestial equator”. Imagine a line that marks the equator on Earth extending up into the sky above the equator from north to south. Earth’s two hemispheres receive the Sun’s rays about equally. The Sun is overhead at noon as seen from the equator, so at this point, the amount of nighttime and daytime (sunlight) are roughly equal to each other.

Fun Facts & Myths

From www.timeanddate.com:

The Snake of Sunlight
A famous ancient equinox celebration was the Mayan sacrificial ritual by the main pyramid at Chichen Itza, Mexico. The pyramid, known as El Castillo, has 4 staircases running from the top to the bottom of the pyramid’s faces, notorious for the bloody human sacrifices that used to take place here. The staircases are built at a carefully calculated angle which makes it look like an enormous snake of sunlight slithers down the stairs on the day of the equinox.

Other Customs

Shutterbug Saturday: September Beauty

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Flowers, critters and ‘shrooms for today. All photos are my personal collection ©. ~Vic

Coleus & Adirondack Image One
My favorite place to sit.
08-25-2018
Yellow Ironweed & Bug Image Two
Just hanging out.
09-08-2018
Bee & Yellow Ironweed Image Three
Got the bee’s hiney. LOL!
09-08-2018
Bumble In The Liriope Image Four
Another shot of the Bumble I chased all over the yard.
08-17-2018
Shroom Farm Image Five
Happy ‘shrooms on the hill.
08-06-2018

Shutterbug Saturday: Flowers For Everyone

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All photos, below, are my personal collection ©. ~Vic

Lily Image One
Happy grasshopper on the Lily.
08-06-2018

 
Arizona Sun Image Two
I see you!
Arizona Sun
08-06-2018

Rose of Sharon Image Three
Cheery Rose of Sharon bloom.
08-16-2018

 
Black-eyed Susan Image Four
Black-eyed Susans hanging out.
08-06-2018

 
Hibiscus Image Five
Happy Hibiscus
09-01-2018

 
Liriope Image Six
I followed this Bumblebee all over the place.
It went from Liriope to Liriope.
I finally got a shot.
08-17-2018

Throwback Thursday: 1966

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My Baby Picture
Personal Collection

Fifty-two years ago, today, I appeared (Hey!). That makes me a Solar Virgoan via Tropical Astrology and a Fire Horse via Chinese Astrology (as are all the folks born January 21, 1966 thru February 8, 1967). I was a mid-morning baby that was a little bit late (it’s warm and comfortable in there) and a full Pisces Moon showed up at 8:14pm EDT. I think I decided to hang out and wait for the full moon (howling). It’s probably why I am so fascinated and attracted to our glorious Moon.

I was born on my maternal Grandmother’s birthday. I used to joke that she and I were 51 years and 35 minutes apart. I was also her only grandchild with a different last name (there ‘were’ 10 of us). On the other side of the family, I was the first girl born into the family in three generations and the only granddaughter. I had my paternal Grandmother all to myself for 12 years. My paternal Grandfather bought a fifth of Old Grandad bourbon which he intended to drink with me when I turned 21. He didn’t make it. I still have the unopened bottle of bourbon. At one time, the label reflected bottling in 1961.

I was a Vietnam War baby. I did a post, earlier in the month, which covers my ‘almost Army Brat’ status. I hadn’t quite reached my third birthday when Neil Armstrong was heard over the air ‘small-stepping & giant-leaping’ and I wasn’t even four, yet, when Jack Swigert told Houston they’d had a problem. I was nine days old when Star Trek boldly debuted.

I was a child of the 70s and a teen of the 80s. I am one of the early Generation X group. I remember watching Scooby Doo, Super Friends and Looney Tunes (Bugs Bunny & Tweety Show) on Saturday mornings. Afternoons after school, it was Sesame Street and The Electric Company. I remember The Carol Burnette Show, The Donnie & Marie Show, Dance Fever and Solid Gold. I loved watching One Day At A Time, Charlie’s Angels, The Bionic Woman, Happy Days and Wonder Woman. I also watched ‘wrastlin’ with my dad and just about every cop show you could think of (he controlled the TV most of the time). I was 11 when I bought my first album Surf & Drag. I was 13 when everyone was wondering “Who shot J.R.?”. I was just shy of my 15th birthday when MTV was born. My first rock concert was The Police: Synchronicity Tour. I also got to see England Dan & John Ford Coley in 1976 at Carowinds with my mom.

I graduated high school at 17 in 1984…yeah, the same year as the scary book. I wasn’t even close to my 20th birthday when I watched the Challenger Space Shuttle explode in stunned silence. Twelve days after my 35th birthday, I watched, again, in stunned silence as two planes flew into the Twin Towers and Flight 93 crashed in rural Pennsylvania. Things were never the same after that day.

So much has changed from the world I grew up in. ~Victoria

People I share a birthday with:
Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley 1797
Frederick ‘Fred’ Martin MacMurray 1908
Theodore Samuel ‘Ted’ Williams 1918
Kitty Wells (Ellen Muriel Deason) 1919
Geoffrey Beene (Samuel Albert Bozeman, Jr.) 1927
William Edward ‘Bill’ Daily, Jr. 1927
Warren Edward Buffett 1930
John Leonard ‘Jack’ Swigert, Jr. 1931
John Edmund Andrew Phillips 1935
Bruce Leslie McLaren 1937
Frank Edwin ‘Tug’ McGraw, Jr. 1944
Margaret Ann ‘Peggy’ Lipton 1946
Lewis Niles Black 1948
Timothy James Bottoms 1951
Anna Stepanovna Politkovskaya 1958
Gary Ivan Gordon 1960
Alexander Valterovich Litvinenko 1962
Michael Charles Chiklis 1963
Michael Michele Williams 1966

Sturgeon Moon 2018

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The Sturgeon is a big, prehistoric fish that is rather common to the Great Lakes. Native American fishing tribes, like the Algonquin, are credited with naming August’s full moon. It is also known as a Red Moon due to August heat and hazy days, giving the moon a red tint.

Other names:
Green Corn Moon
Grain moon

Moon Image One
Personal Collection

 

Moon Image Two
Personal Collection

100% full illumination occurred at 07:56am EDT.

Howl for me…
~Vic

Shutterbug Saturday: Kitties

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We have several neighborhood cats. Some are really, really nice and just want to be petted. Others…well, let’s just say I have a healthy respect for them. All photos are my personal collection. © ~Vic

Cat Image One
Not a care in the world, this one.
Local sweet Persian mix.
Cat Image Two
“I’m watching you…”
Unknown Calico.
Cat Image Three
Sweet, sweet baby, missing a foot.
Sweet Tuxedo ‘Gemini’.
Cat Image Four
“How dare you pet that other kitty!”
A very unhappy Maine Coon mix…’Yow Ming’.
Cat Image Five
And, my Oliver…The Hemingway.
He watches the world happen through the windows.