1993

Song Sunday: Fade Into You

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Mazzy Star Image
Image Credit: jammytoast.com

“I think it’s strange you never knew…”

Sunday evening’s playlist submission is Fade Into You by alternative band Mazzy Star. Released April 12, 1994, it is the first track on the album So Tonight That I Might See. Written by Hope Sandoval and David Roback, it was a surprise hit, peaking at #44 on Billboard’s Hot 100, #19 on the Mainstream Top 40 chart, #3 on the Modern Rock Tracks (Alternative Songs, now) chart and #48 on the UK Singles chart. It was Mazzy Star‘s only single to make to make the Billboard Hot 100. It has been used, frequently, in movies, most notably Starship Troopers, Lord of War, Burlesque and Thank You For Your Service plus several TV shows.

I’d never heard of Mazzy Star or heard this song when it originally came out. I am late to the party finding this, just discovering them a few years ago. Sadly, David Roback passed away February 24, 2020, from cancer.

Lyrics

MTV Version

Monochrome Version

Throwback Thursday: World Wide Web 1993

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World Wide Web Tech Spot Image
Image Credit: techspot.com

And, the world was never the same. ~Vic

On April 30, 1993, four years after publishing a proposal for “an idea of linked information systems,” computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee released the source code for the world’s first web browser and editor. Originally called Mesh, the browser that he dubbed WorldWideWeb became the first royalty-free, easy-to-use means of browsing the emerging information network that developed into the internet as we know it today.

Berners-Lee was a fellow at CERN, the research organization headquartered in Switzerland. Other research institutions like the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Stanford University had developed complex systems for internally sharing information and Berners-Lee sought a means of connecting CERN’s system to others. He outlined a plan for such a network in 1989 and developed it over the following years. [He] wrote and published the first web page, a simplistic outline of the WorldWideWeb project, in 1991. Simple Web browsers like Mosaic appeared a short time later and, before long, the Web had become by far the most popular system of its kind.

The creation and globalization of the web is widely considered one of the most transformational events in human history.

Additional Reading & Sources:
The Birth of the Web (CERN)
World Wide Web Launches (The History Channel)
World Wide Web (Wikipedia)

Computer History Museum

30-Day Song Challenge: Day 24

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Music Challenge Image
Photo Credit: goodreads.com

A song by a band you still wish were together…

Oh, the music we have lost.

Lone Justice (1982-1986)
What a powerhouse voice this little thing had. I wore out the Shelter cassette.


 


 

Cry of Love (1989-1997)
A band out of Raleigh, they only made one studio album in 1993 with their original lead singer, Kelly Holland, who quit after one tour. He died young in 2014 at the age of 52. They got a lot of airplay, locally. The remaining members tried to continue with former Warrant lead singer, Robert Mason and made a second album that produced one single in 1997. Band members moved on/scattered to The Black Crowes, Lynyrd Skynyrd and Sheryl Crow‘s touring band. To me, once Kelly left, the magical sound was gone (no offense to Robert Mason).


 


 

Seven Mary Three (1992-2012)
A band out of Williamsburg, Virginia, they started when two Jasons met at William & Mary. The band name came from the TV Show CHiPs as 7 Mary 3 was Officer Jon Baker‘s call sign. Their best-selling album, American Standard, was produced in 1995 by the, now, defunct Mammoth Records out of Carrboro, NC, after their first attempt in 1994 failed to chart.


 


 

Far Too Jones (1995-2000)
This was another band out of Raleigh, nicknamed the Tobacco Road Quintet. They also had one album produced by Mammoth Records and got a lot of local airplay. The only reason this band broke up, as best as I can tell, is because they had no label support. They just couldn’t break out of the region, much like what happened to Echo 7 in Myrtle Beach (whom, I know, personally…I may have to put up some of their music one day).


 


 

And, just for Christmas Eve, this one. I remember this playing on G105 in the late 90s. This band was so loved here. Quote from them, regarding this song, posted on Facebook, yesterday:

“A little history on that one… we wrote it for the Acoustic Christmas Party we did for G105 many moons ago. We actually did not know we were going to write a song until one of the on-air personalities mentioned on the air that we were…LOL!”

Movie Monday: The Three Muskateers 1993

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Three Musketeers 1993 Image One
Photo Credit: pinterest.com
Three Musketeers 1993 Image Two
Photo Credit: film1.nl

Twenty-five years ago, today, the #1 film at the box office was The Three Musketeers, starring:
Charlie Sheen
Kiefer Sutherland
Chris O’Donnell
Oliver Platt
Tim Curry (The original Pennywise)
Rebecca De Mornay
Gabrielle Anwar
Michael Wincott
Paul McGann (Doctor Who #8)

A summary from IMDB:

“A Disney-ized re-telling of Dumas’ classic swashbuckling story of three swordsmen of the disbanded French King’s Guard, plus one young man who dreams to become one of them, who seek to save their King from the scheming of the Cardinal Richelieu. Jokes and stunts are the expected fare in this light-hearted and jaunty adventure.”

It was, apparently, panned by critics but, clearly, did well for Disney. The first song from the soundtrack, All For Love, had some notable success as well. Written by Bryan Adams, John “Mutt” Lange and Michael Kamen and, sung by Adams, Rod Stewart & Sting, it reached #1 in 1994 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, the Billboard Mainstream Top 40 chart, the Eurochart Hot 100, the Canadian RPM chart and, 11 other countries.

Awards:
Most Performed Song From A Film (Michael Kamen/1995 Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI) Film & TV Awards)
Most Performed Songs From Motion Pictures (Bryan Adams, Robert John Lange & Michael Kamen/1995 American Society of Composers, Authors & Publishers (ASCAP) Film & Television Music Awards)

Nominations:
Best Editing ~ Sound Effects (Tim Chau/1994 Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE) Golden Reel Award)
Best Movie Song (Bryan Adams, Rod Stewart & Sting/1994 MTV Movie & TV Awards)
Worst Supporting Actor (Chris O’Donnell/1994 Golden Raspberry (Razzie) Awards)

Interesting Trivia Bits from the Disney Movie Database.


 

Throwback Thursday: Kathy D. Sullivan & Space

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Kathryn D. Sullivan Image
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October 11, 1984, Kathryn Dwyer “Kathy” Sullivan became the first American woman astronaut during the STS-41-G mission to perform an EVA or an extravehicular activity (3.5 hours worth), which freely translates to a “space walk”. This was NASA‘s thirteenth flight in the Space Shuttle program and the sixth flight of the Challenger. She was the Mission Specialist 1 and had just turned 33 years of age eight days prior.

She received a Ph.D. in geology from Dalhousie University in 1978, became an Adjunct Professor of Geology at Rice University in 1985 and joined the Navy Reserves in 1988 as an Oceanography Officer, retiring after 18 years at the rank of Captain.

April 24, 1990, she served on board the Space Shuttle Discovery as a Mission Specialist 3 for the STS-31 mission that launched the Hubble Space Telescope. March 24, 1992, she served as Mission Specialist 1 during the STS-45 mission on board the Space Shuttle Atlantis. She was part of the Group 8 NASA Astronaut selection on January 16, 1978. She left NASA in 1993.

Other October 11 space-related trivia:

1957…..Operation Moonwatch scientists calculate Sputnik 1‘s ‘satisfactory orbit’ with an IBM 704.

1958…..NASA launches the lunar probe Pioneer 1 (Pioneer Program). It falls back to Earth and burns up.

1968…..NASA launches Apollo 7, the first crewed flight.

2000…..NASA launches STS-92, the 100th Space Shuttle mission to the ISS via Discovery.

Flick Friday: The Fugitive 1993

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Harrison Ford Fugitive Image
Photo Credit: rogerebert.com

Twenty-five years ago, today, the number one movie was The Fugitive, a suspense film that was based on the TV Show that ran from 1963 to 1967 on ABC starring David Janssen.

Tommy Lee Jones won an Oscar and a Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actor and, the film was nominated for Best Cinematography, Film Editing, Best Original Score, Sound, Sound Effects Editing and Best Picture. Jones reprised his role of U.S. Marshal Samuel Gerard in the spin-off U.S. Marshals.

Some trivia: The bus/train wreck is a tourist attraction in Dillsboro, North Carolina.

The television show started before I was born and I was just an infant when it ceased production. I have picked up a re-run or two over the years. Harrison Ford managed to capture the intensity that David Janssen displayed nearly 30 years earlier. ~Victoria

Tune Tuesday: UB40 1993

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UB40 BBC Image
Photo Credit: bbc.co.uk

It’s Tune Tuesday! Twenty-five years ago, today, the number one song was I Can’t Help Falling In Love, a Reggae version of Elvis’ hit from the 1961 soundtrack and movie of the same name, Blue Hawaii. Both of these versions topped the U.S. & U.K. charts.

I am also posting the clip from the movie. Elvis’ original didn’t make it to number one on the Billboard Hot 100 (which is usually where I get my number one songs from) in the U.S., getting stuck at number two behind Peppermint Twist but, it did make it to number one in the U.K. & Australia in early 1962. It was a number one hit on the Billboard Adult Contemporary Chart in January 1962:

Plus, I have to confess that, while I like Reggae, I am an Elvis fan and I prefer the original (no offense, guys!).

~Victoria